Friday, November 28, 2008

Henry Cockrum Family Update

Below is the information gathered so far on the Henry Cockrum family. Any additional information, corrections or comments would be appreciated.

Henry Cockrum 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 was born about 1831 in Missouri. Henry lived in Fannin County, Texas in 1850. He purchased land in Cooke County in 1858. By 1860, Henry had moved his family to the Choctaw Nation (Indian Lands). He was back in Cooke County by 1862. He died on 13 Oct 1862 in Gainesville, Cooke, Texas as a victim of "The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas 1862".

Question?? The 1860 Census has children in the household that don't seem to fit into the family. Were these extra children in the household, nieces & nephews, grandchildren, foster kids, or did they belong to Henry & Elizabeth? In the 1900 Census, Elizabeth states she gave birth to 6 children and 4 where still living. We need help figuring out all the children!!

Henry married13 Elizabeth Lackey Petell Jones 9,10,11,12, called "Lizzy,"on 19 May 1849 in Fannin County, Texas. Henry was her third husband. Elizabeth was born on 6 Mar 1820 in Kentucky.
Elizabeth was first married to John Petell. After he died, she married a second time to (unknown given-name) Jones. On her marriage record to Henry Cockrum, she is listed as Elizabeth Jones.
By 1870, Elizabeth had moved her family to Lawrence County, Missouri. In 1900, she is living with a grand-daughter in Indian Territory. She died on 10 Apr 1906 in Oil Center, Pontotoc, Oklahoma. She was buried in Box X Cemetery, Pontotoc, Oklahoma.

Henry and Elizabeth had the following children:
i. Amanda Cockrum was born on 2 Apr 1850 in Texas. She died14 on 8 Feb 1921 in El Reno, Canadian, Oklahoma.
Amanda married (1) William Martin Elliott 15,16 on 20 May 1866 in , Cooke, Texas. William was born about 1838. He died on 14 May 1875 in , Cooke, Texas. Mande and William lived near the Red River where William ran a ferry boat at Horse Shoe Bend (now in Lake Texoma). William was murdered 14 May 1875 while trying to collect a debt.
Amanda married (2) James Franklin Meler on 7 Jun 1877 in Cooke Co., Texas. James was born in Dec 1856 in Alabama. He died17 on 3 Oct 1923 in El Reno, Canadian Co., Oklahoma.
ii. Lucinda Cockrum was born on 17 Oct 1854 in Texas. She died on 25 Jun 1921 in Oklahoma. She was buried in Rosedale Cemetery, Ada, Pontotoc, Oklahoma.
Lucinda married Franklin Travis Jones about 1878 in Texas. Franklin was born on 13 Apr 1853 in Grayson, Texas.
iii. William Henry Cockrum was born about 1856 in Texas. He died in May 1889 in Dexter, Cooke, Texas.
William married Alveria Harriet Ford on 22 Jul 1875 in Cooke, Texas. Alveria was born in Apr 1859.
iv. Edward Cockrum was born on 17 Dec 1860 in Cooke, Texas. He died18 on 23 Apr 1924 in Joplin, Jasper, Missouri.
Edward married (1) Joycie F. Morton . Joycie was born on 18 Aug 1855 in Granby, Newton, Missouri. She died on 2 Dec 1913 in Joplin, Jasper, Missouri.
Edward married (2) Mary Smith .

Elizabeth was first married to John Petell on 8 Feb 1838 in , Pike, Illinois.
Elizabeth and John had the following known children:
v. John W. Petell was born about 1843 in Illinois.
vi. M. Petell, a female, was born about 1839 in Illinois.
Could this be the 22 year old Malvina in the 1860 census???

Elizabeth then married second husband, (unknown given-name) Jones about 1846.
They had one known child – a daughter born about 1848. She was listed as “A. Jones” in the 1850 census.
vii. A. Jones , a female, was born about 1848 in Texas.

Sources
1. Gainesville Great Hanging Sources."One of forty Union sympathizing citizens of North Texas who were charged with treason against the Confederacy by a Citizens Court in Gainesville, Cooke County in October 1862 and then executed in the Great Hanging at Gainesville.References:1. Richard B. McCaslin, "Tainted Breeze, The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas, 1862" (Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Louisiana State University Press, 1994).2. George W. Diamond, "Account of the Great Hanging at Gainesville, 1862" SOUTHWESTERN HISTORICAL QUARTERLY, Vol. 66, no. 3, January, 1963, p. 331-414, edited by Sam Acheson and Julie Ann Hudson
O'Connell.3. James L. Clark, "Civil War Recollections of James Lemuel Clark, Including Previously Unpublished Material On The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas In October, 1862" (College Station, Texas: Texas A&M University Press, 1984).".
2. George Washington Diamond's Account of the Great Hanging at Gainesville, 1862, ManuscripteEdited by Sam Acheson and Julie, The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Vol. LXVI, January, 1963, No. 3, pages 331-414, pg .397.George W. Diamond was a brother of secessionists, John R. Diamond and James J. Diamond, who was a principal in the Great Hanging. After the hangings and the adjournment of the court, Diamond was given the records for the purpose of "preserving them and so disposing of them that the history of its (Citizen's Court) transactions might be perpetuated and justice done to those who participated in its deliberations. Diamond's compilation of "memoranda" was to be offered to the public as a just vindicaton of the conduct of those whose judgements were under national criticism. The members of the court examined Diamond's account and gave their unanimous and unqualified approval."pg 397The State vs. C. A. Jones("HumpBack"), James Powers ("Carpenter"), Eli M. Scott, Thomas Baker ("Old Man"), Geo W Anderson, Abraham McNeese, Henry Cochran ("30"), C.F. Anderson, Wm Wernell, B.F. Barnes ("35 or 40"), Wm Rodes, and N. M. Clark ("25").Disloyalty & Treason.The testimony against the above mentioned conspirators corresponds with the testimony herein before produced on the trial of Childs, Fields, Harper, Lock, and others. They all acknowledged their connection with the organization, and made full confession of their guilt at the gallows.===pg 398 Witness in trial against Ramey DayBen F. Barnes sworn.(Witness)I was at the meeting at Richie's Mill. Dr. Foster said the object of the meeting was to resue Harper; and he wanted us to take our guns and go -- myself and Ramey Dye. The reason we did not go to rescue Harper was because a messenger (Essman) told us that there were a great many soldiers in Gainesville and we were then afraid."
3. Connor, Seymour V. , Peters Colony of Texas, A History and Biographical Sketches of the Early Settlers, Texas State Historical Association; Austin; 1959."page 222 "Henry Cockrum was issued a certificate by the county court of Cooke County for 640 acres. Since his claim was later disallowed, it is doubtful that he was a bona fide colonist."(**note: There is also a Edward Cockrum listed as receiving a certificate for 320 acres in Cooke County and in 1857 having his claim also disallowed.)."
4. Probate Record, Cooke County Probate Book 1, page 380-381, Sep 1863."Cooke County Probate Book 1, page 380-381, 5 September 1863(bottom of page 380 and continuing on top of page 381)Appraisement Bill of the Community property of Henry Cockrum, Decd70 head of sheep @ $4 280.0035 head of stock cattle @$9 315.001 Yoke of Oxen $100 & 19 head of horses @ $80 1620.001span mules $400 & 1 bay horse $200 600.002 head of hogs @ $10 160 acres of land @$2 340.00160 acres of land & improvements 250.002 setts of harnes & one wagon 175.00Farming tools $25 2 log chains $14 39.001 corss but saw $10 1 box of tools $15 35.001 note $80 Debt on Doct Martin $350 430.00
1 block $25 Household furniture $150 175.002 steers @ $40 80.00 Total $4,329.00Page 381The State of TexasCounty of CookeThis is to certify that I have made a true and correct exhibit of all the property belonging to the estate of Henry Cockrum Decd, that has come to my knowledge.Elizabeth CockrumSworn to subscribed before me this 28th day of September AD 1863Saml Gooding, Clerk."
5. 1850 U.S. Census, Texas, Fannin County, Household #1, pg 142."In the 1850 Fannin County, Texas census, household #1Henry (Harry) Cockran, age 19, farmer, born MissouriElizabeth Cockran, age 26, born KentuckyA. Cockran, age 2/12 months, female, born TexasJno. W. Petell, age 6, born IllinoisM. Petell age 10, female, born IllinoisA. Jones, age 2, female, born Texas."
6. Land/Deed Records."Cooke County Deed Records3 July 1858Purchased 160 acres8 July 1858Purchased 100 acres."
7.
1860 U.S. Census, Choctaw Nation, Indian Lands, Arkansas.
"Name: Henry Cockram Age in 1860: 28 Birth Year: abt 1832 Birthplace: Missouri Home in 1860: Choctaw Nation, Indian Lands, Arkansas Gender: Male Value of real estate: Household Members: Name Age
Henry Cockram, 28 Elizabeth Cockram, 36 Malvina Cockram, 22 Isafena Cockram, 13 Susana Cockram, 9 Luanda Cockram, 8 Wm Henry Cockram, 5 Edward Cockram, 3 Catharine Cockram. 6 Malinda Cockram, 5 Manuel Cockram, 4 John Hoosier, 8.12 Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Choctaw Nation, Indian Lands, Arkansas; Roll: M653_52; Page: 1211; Image: 740.Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Eighth Census of the United States, 1860. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860. M653,."
8. Family Information."I am sorry it has taken me so long to get this out to you. I have had a very_busy couple of weeks._I am attaching six family group sheets for William Henry Cockrum, his_children and grandchildren._My husband's family descends through Amanda Cockrum Meler's daughter Alice._Alice was quite a person in her younger years. As a result Amanda raised_Novva Cockran (one of Alice's marriages was to William Cockran-no relation)._This is my husband's grandmother. She lived to be 100 years old. Amanda had told her that she watched her father hang and Novva passed this story down to the family. I have corresponded with a few Meler relatives and a few_Elliot relatives so I know there are many descendants out there._The information on Preston, Isom and some on William Henry comes from "A_History of the Cockrum Family in America" by Emmett Cockrum. There is a_family that is posted on Ancestry that has a different ancestry for William_Henry. I have not done enough research on this family to know which I think_is correct._I have a copy of the marriage cert for William and Elizabeth Jones. Given_that there were children in the census named Peters and Jones, it is_possible that Elizabeth was married before. The cert does not identify her_as Mrs. Jones. They could have been taking care of others children also._Elizabeth is buried in Box X Cemetery, Pontotoc County, OK. Amanda and Frank_Meler are buried in El Reno, OK. I have copies of the records from the Cooke_County Courthouse regarding the property left by William Henry. William_Henry filed for land in Fannin County. William Henry, Elizabeth and family_are in the Fannin County census in 1850 and Jacks Fork, Indian Territory_census in 1860. _If I come across anything else I will let you know. It has been several_years since I have worked on this family line. Please let me know if these_come through alright and if there is anything else I can do._R. Sheppard."
9. 1850 U.S. Census, Texas, Fannin County, Household #1, pg 142."In the 1850 Fannin County, Texas census, household #1Henry (Harry) Cockran, age 19, farmer, born MissouriElizabeth Cockran, age 26, born KentuckyA. Cockran, age 2/12 months, female, born TexasJno. W. Petell, age 6, born IllinoisM. Petell age 10, female, born IllinoisA. Jones, age 2, female, born Texas."
10. 1860 U.S. Census, Choctaw Nation, Indian Lands, Arkansas. "Name: Henry Cockram Age in 1860: 28 Birth Year: abt 1832 Birthplace: Missouri Home in 1860: Choctaw Nation, Indian Lands, Arkansas Gender: Male; Value of real estate: Household Members: Name Age Henry Cockram, 28 Elizabeth Cockram, 36 Malvina Cockram, 22 Isafena Cockram, 13 Susana Cockram, 9 Luanda Cockram, 8 Wm Henry Cockram, 5 Edward Cockram, 3 Catharine Cockram. 6 Malinda Cockram, 5 Manuel Cockram, 4 John Hoosier, 8.12 Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Choctaw Nation, Indian Lands, Arkansas; Roll: M653_52; Page: 1211; Image: 740.Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Eighth Census of the
United States, 1860. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860. M653,."
11.
1870 U.S. Census, Mount Pleasant, Lawrence, Missouri.
"Name: Elizabeth Cochrum Estimated Birth Year: abt 1821 Age in 1870: 49 Birthplace: Kentucky Home in 1870: Mount Pleasant, Lawrence, Missouri Post Office: Mount Vernon Race: White Gender: Female Value of real estate: No Real Estate
Household Members: Name Age Elizabeth Cochrum, 49 Susan Cochrum, 17 Lucinda Cochrum, 16 William H Cochrum, 13 Edward Cochrum, 11 Malinda Petell, 14 John Petell, 10 (Note: Who are the Petell children? Elizabeth’s children by John Petell are listed in the 1850 census for the Cockrum family. Could these Petell children be Elizabeth's grandchildren from the 10 year old female in the 1850 census??) Source Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: Mount Pleasant, Lawrence, Missouri; Roll: M593_787; Page: 458; Image: 86.Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2003. Original data: 1870."
12. 1900 U.S. Census, Township 4, Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory; page 41, ED 120, 7 Jul 1900. "Note: Living with granddaughter's family, Annie McCurry, daugther of Lucinda Jones.Name: Lizzy Cochran Home in 1900: Township 4, Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory Age: 81 Born: Mar 1819; Birthplace: Kentucky Race: White; Relationship to head-of-house: Mother-in-law (should read grandmother-in-law)Household Members: Name Age Daniel McCurry, 29 Annie McCurry, 19 Arthur McCurry, 4 Myrtle McCurry, 1 Lizzy Cochran, 81, Mar 1819, widowed, 6 births 4 living, Kentucky, Kentucky, Kentucky Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Township 4, Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory; Roll: T623 1846; .Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623."
13. Marriage Record, Texas Marriage Collection, 1814-1909; Ancestry.com. "Name: Henry Cochrum Marriage Date: 19 May 1849 Spouse: Elizabeth Jones Marriage County: Fannin Marriage State: Texas Source: Texas Marriages, 1814-1909 Source Information: Ancestry.com. Texas Marriage Collection, 1814-1909 and 1966-2002 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005."
14. Cemetery Records."Amanda is buried in El Reno, OK's only cemetery next to her husband. They are buried in the old section,
Block 39, Lot 4, Grave C."
15. Family Tradition & Stories. "It was at Dexter,Tx that William ran the Ferryboat. Martin Elliott Jr is my GG Grandfather and I have the data to show my Great X (10) Grandparents. Rabourn Elliott was also a brother to William Elliott and he was my Great grand father and he married Elvoria (Elvira) Brown (Elliott) he too ran the Ferryboat and died in 1875 Cooke Co Tx. Willim Elliott had been killed by horse thiefs and ones that owed him a debt. We have proof of this and it is on his Grave marker at Burneyville,Ok. When Rabour died, that left my Grandfather to run the Dexter Ferryboat along with my Grandmother Annie Jane Hilton (Elliott) His name, Doc McHenry Elliott and like to be called Big Doc Elliott. He was thirteen years old when he began to run the Ferryboat. I have articles on Him and my grandmother. They called him "The Riverboat Man" and Her "The Boat Woman" She loved the River and didnt want to leave and go back to Love Co Marietta, Oklahoma where they both lived and died. Most of the Elliotts are in that part of the country today. My Grandpa Doc was forced to take Bonnie and Clyde Parker (outlaws) over into Texas by means of the Red River. He use to lay around on the porch and tell me the stories.From Cockrum Genforum."
16. Family Tradition & Stories. "Mande and William lived near the Red River where William ran a ferry boat at Horse Shoe Bend (now in Lake Texoma). William was murdered 14 May 1875 while trying to collect a debt."
17. Cemetery Records ."Amanda is buried in El Reno, OK's only cemetery next to her husband. They are buried in the old section, Block 39, Lot 4, Grave C."
18. Death Certificate, http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/resources/deathcertificates/."Missouri Death Certificate Edward Cockrum Death: April 23, 1924, Jasper Joplin 11619 Birth: December 17, 1860, Cooke County, Texas Father: Wm Cockrum Mother: unknown Informant: Mary Cockrum (2nd wife to Edward)."

Tuesday, November 25, 2008

More on Eli S. Thomas & Family

Susan Mary Hedenburg, wife of Eli Sigler Thomas.
She went by her middle name of "Mary" in most records.
Susan Mary Hedenburg was born 19 SEP 1828 in Kentucky. She was the daughter of Peter Cadmus HEDENBERG (b: 23 SEP 1790 in New York City) and Susan M. SPENCER (b: 6 NOV 1803 in New York City). As a youth, her family moved to Jacksonville, Morgan County, Illinois. Her father was a harness maker and "saddler".
Susan Mary married Eli Thomas on 6 Apr 1853 in Morgan County, Illinois. They had two children: Owen Cadmus THOMAS (b: 15 AUG 1854 in Iowa) and Mary Alice (Allie) THOMAS (b: 22 MAY 1858 in Texas.)
After her husband Eli S. Thomas was killed in the Gainesville Hangings, she married William C. HAYS on 3 MAY 1863 in Grayson County, Texas. They had one son. William Hays died in 1880. Susan Mary died in 1898.
Her obituary reads:
Mrs. S. M. Hays died the 31st day of March, 1898. She was sick 11 days. She was born September 1, 1828, in Kentucky. Her father, Peter Hedenberg moved to Jacksonville, Ill, when she was quite small, where she was raised. In April 5, 1853 she was married to Eli S. Thomas and lived with him till October 19, 1862, when he died. She married William. C. Hays May 3, 1863. He died in 1880. She had been a consistent member of the Christian Church since she was 22years old. Barton Stone baptized her. She was a loving mother and good and kind to every one. She took great delight in reading this paper. She lived with her only daughter. She leaves two sons and one daughter and a host of neighbors and friends to mourn her loss. What was our loss was gain.
Mrs. A. Sloan, Mangum, Oklahoma

She is buried in Newport Cemetery, Jack County, Texas, next to her second husband and her two oldest children. The cemetery is located N of Newport, Texas, about 0.5 miles N on CR 1288, E of road.
Hays, Susan Mary, Sep 19, 1828, Mar 31, 1898, 3, 23
Hays, Wm. Carrel, Aug 17, 1817, 1892, 3, 23,
Thomas, Owen C., Aug 15, 1854, Apr 11, 1936, 3, 23
Thomas, Nancy J., Aug 21, 1860, May 22, 1936, 3, 23
Sloan, Mary Alice, May 22, 1858, Oct 22, 1926, 3, 23

Eli S. Thomas Family
Doctor Eli Sigler Thomas 1,2,3,4,5 was born about 1823 in Ohio. He died on 19 Oct 1862 in the Great Hanging at Gainesville, Cooke County, Texas.
Eli married7 Susan Mary Hedenberg 6 on 6 Apr 1853 in Morgan, Illinois. Susan was born on 1 Sep 1828 in Kentucky. She died8 on 31 Mar 1898 in Texas. She was buried9 in Newport Cemetery, Jack, Texas.
They had the following children:
1. Owen Cadmus Thomas 10 was born on 15 Aug 1854 in Iowa - probably in Lee County, Iowa. He died11 on 11 Apr 1936 in Wichita, Texas. He was buried12 in Newport Cemetery, Jack Texas.
Owen married Nancy Jane Hughey . Nancy was born on 21 Aug 1860 in Fayetteville, Alabama. She died13 on 22 May 1936 in Wichita Falls, Wichita, Texas. She was buried14 in Newport Cemetery, Jack Texas.
2. Mary Alice Thomas "Allie" was born on 22 May 1858 in Texas. She died on 22 Oct 1926. She was buried15 in Newport Cemetery, Jack Texas.
Mary married Arthur M. Sloan . Arthur was born on 24 Jul 1859. He died on 13 Oct 1890. He was buried16 in Newport Cemetery, Jack Texas.

Sources
1. 1860 U.S. Census, Texas, Cooke County, Gainesville, hh 375/387."Name: Eli Thomas Age in 1860: 37 Birth Year: abt 1823 Birthplace: Ohio Home in 1860: Cooke, Texas; Post Office: Gainesville Value of real estate: $2,000; Value of personal estate: $8,460Occupation: M.D.Household Members: Name Age Eli Thomas, 37, Ohio Mary Thomas, 31, KentuckyOwen C Thomas, 6, IowaMary A Thomas, 9, Texas Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: , Cooke, Texas; Roll: M653_1291; Page: 246; Image: 501."
2. Will, Cooke County, Texas Wills, Vol 1, pg 324-325, 19 Oct 1862."The State of TexasCounty of CookeIn the name of God Amen. I, Eli S. Thomas of the County of Cooke State aforesaid being of sound mind and memory and considering the uncertainty of this frail and transitory life do therefore make and ordain publish and declare this to be my last will and testament, that is to say first after all my lawful debts are paid and discharged, the residue of my estate real and personal, I give bequeath and dispose of all as follows to wit, To my beloved wife Susan Mary Thomas during her natural life, and to my son Owen Cadmus and my daughter Mary Alice for their use and benefit.Likewise, I make constitute and appoint my wife Susan Mary Thomas Guardian and Administratrix of this my last Will and Testament, hereby revoking all former wills by me made.
I further wish that my estate may not be probated.In witness whereof I hereunto subscribe my name and affix my seal using scroll this 19th day of October AD 1862.Eli S. ThomasSworn and subscribed before me the undersighned authority this 19th day of October AD 1862 in the Town of Gainesville.Sam'l Gooding, Clerk."
3. Family Information." Eli sigler Thomas, a medical doctor from Ohio moved to Illinois where he married April 5 1853 to Susan Mary Hedenberg. They moved to Cooke County, Texas where E. S. Thomas was hanged in what is referred to as the "GreatHanging" in Gainsville, Texas. Reasons for the trial of 40 men who opposed the Confederacy differ. What is known is that none of those convicted owned slaves while the jury members were slave owners. Cooke county had voted against secession from the Union."
4. Gainesville Great Hanging Sources: 1. Richard B. McCaslin, "Tainted Breeze, The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas, 1862" (Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Louisiana State University Press, 1994).2. George W. Diamond, "Account of the Great Hanging at Gainesville, 1862" SOUTHWESTERN HISTORICAL QUARTERLY, Vol. 66, no. 3, January, 1963, p. 331-414, edited by Sam Acheson and Julie Ann Hudson O'Connell.3. James L. Clark, "Civil War Recollections of James Lemuel Clark, Including Previously Unpublished Material On The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas In October, 1862" (College Station, Texas: Texas A&M University Press, 1984).".
5. State Census, Iowa State Census, 1856, Lee County, 1856."Name: Eli S Thomas Census Date: 1856 Residence County: Lee; Residence State: Iowa; Locality: Washington; Birth Location: Ohio; Family Number: 110; Birth Year: abt 1826; Line: 16; Roll: IA_58; Household Members: Eli S Thomas, 30; Mary Thomas, 27; Cadmus Thomas, 1; John Thomas, 39; Wm Van Scyhock, 16. Source Information: Ancestry.com. Iowa State Census Collection, 1836-1925 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2007. Original data: Microfilm of Iowa State Censuses, 1856, 1885, 1895, 1905, 1915, 1925 as well various special censuses from 1836-1897 obtained from the State Historical Society of Iowa via Heritage Quest."
6. 1850 U.S. Census, Illinois, Morgan County, Jacksonville, pg 180.
"21 year old, Mary Hedenberg, is listed in her father's household. He is listed by his first initial, "P"Source Citation: Year: 1850; Census Place: Jacksonville, Morgan, Illinois; Roll: M432_122; Page: 180;."
7. Marriage Record, http://www.ilsos.gov/GenealogyMWeb/marrsrch.html."Illinois State Archives -- Online Databasehttp://www.ilsos.gov/GenealogyMWeb/marrsrch.htmlIllinois Statewide Marriage Index, 1763–1900Morgan County, Illinois====THOMAS, ELI to HEDENLERY, MARY; 1853-04-06; B/ 90 2808 MORGAN."
8. Obituary."Obituary: Mrs. S. M. Hays died the 31st day of March, 1898. She was sick 11 days. She was born September 1, 1828, in Kentucky. Her father, Peter Hedenberg moved to Jacksonville, Ill, when she was quite small, where she was raised. In April 5, 1853 she was married to Eli S. Thompson (Thomas) and lived with him till October 19, 1862, when he died. She married William. C. Hays May 3, 1863. He died in 1880. She had been a consistent member of the Christian Church since she was 22years old. Barton Stone baptized her. She was a loving mother and good and kind to every one. She took great delight in reading this paper, She lived with her only daughter. She leaves two sons and one daughter and a host of neighbors and friends to mourn her loss. What was our loss was gain.Mrs A. SloanMangum, Oklahoma."
9. Cemetery Records. Newport Cemetery, Jack, TexasThe cemetery is located N of Newport, Texas, about 0.5 miles N on CR 1288, E of road.http://www.cemeteries-of-tx.com/Wtx/Jack/cemetery/Newport.html == Hays, Susan Mary, Sep 19, 1828, Mar 31, 1898, 3, 23

Hays, Wm. Carrel, Aug 17, 1817, 1892, 3, 23,
Thomas, Owen C., Aug 15, 1854, Apr 11, 1936, 3, 23
Thomas, Nancy J., Aug 21, 1860, May 22, 1936, 3, 23
Sloan, Mary Alice, May 22, 1858, Oct 22, 1926, 3, 23.
10. Family Information. "Owen Cadmus THOMAS Birth: 15 AUG 1854 in IOWA Death: 11 APR 1936_Father: Eli Sigler THOMAS b: 1823 _Mother: Susan Mary HEDENBERG b: 19 SEP 1828 in Kentucky_Marriage 1 Nancy Jane HUGHEY b: 21 AUG 1860 Children Teb THOMAS b: 1897 Henry THOMAS Victor Malone THOMAS b: 28 JAN 1893 Artie THOMAS b: 7 AUG 1899 Muriel THOMAS b: 1903."
11. Death Index."Name: Owen Cadmus Thomas; Death Date: 11 Apr 1936; Death County: Wichita; Certificate: 23618; Source Information:Ancestry.com. Texas Death Index, 1903-2000 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006. Original data: Texas Department of Health. Texas Death Indexes, 1903-2000. Austin, TX, USA: Texas Department of Health, State Vital Statistics Unit."
12. Cemetery Records. Newport Cemetery, Jack, Texas

13. Death Certificate, Collection: Texas Deaths, 1890-1976; http://www.familysearch.org/. "Name: Nancy Jane Thomas Death date: 22 May 1936 Death place: Wichita Falls, Wichita, Texas Gender: FemaleRace or color (on document): White Age at death: 75 years 9 months 1 day Birth date: 21 Aug 1860Birth place: Fayetteville, Ala.Marital status: WidowedSpouse name: Owen Cadmus Thomas Father name: James ... HugheyFather birth place: S. Carlina Mother name: Hulda Bruton Mother birth place: Mississippi Occupation: Housewife Residence: Wichita Falls, Texas Burial place: Newport, Texas Burial date: 24 May 1936Additional relatives: XFilm number: 2116935Digital GS number: 4166731Image number: 3628Reference number: cn 28494Collection: Texas Deaths, 1890-1976; www.familysearch.org."
14. Cemetery Records. Newport Cemetery, Jack, Texas

15. Cemetery Records. Newport Cemetery, Jack, Texas
16. Cemetery Records. Newport Cemetery, Jack, Texas

Doctor Eli Sigler Thomas

There were several physicians executed in the Gainesville Hangings -- Eli Sigler Thomas was one of them.

Doctor Eli Sigler Thomas was born in Ohio. His parents are unknown at this time. He married Susan Mary Hedenburg 5 Apr 1853 in Morgan County, Illinois. Susan was the daughter of Peter Cadmus Hedenberg and Susan Spencer of Jacksonville, Morgan, Illinois.

By 1854, Eli and Susan were living in Iowa when their son, Owen Cadmus Thomas, was born on 15 Aug 1854. Eli is listed on the 1856 Lee County, Iowa State Census as a farmer. His wife, son, Cadmus, and a 39 year old, John Thomas are listed with him.
Is the John Thomas living in the household a brother to Eli Thomas? Who are Eli's parents?


1856 Lee County, Iowa State Census

It is not known exactly if, when, or where Eli Thomas received his medical training to become a physician. He was listed as a farmer in the 1856 Iowa State Census and as a "M.D." in the 1860 Cooke County, Texas Census.

Sometime between 1856 and May of 1858, Eli and family moved to Texas. Daughter, Mary Alice (Allie), was born 22 May 1858 in Texas. Eli is listed in the 1860 Cooke County, Texas Census as a 37 year old "M.D." born in Ohio. The value of his real estate is $2,000 and $8,460 of personal estate. One of his near neighbors listed in the census, was A. D. Scott (Alexander D. Scott), who was also a victim of the hanging.

1860 Cooke County, Texas Census


Eli S. Thomas was one of 19 men condemned by the jury of the 'Great Hanging at Gainesville' on October 18 and hanged on Sunday, October 19, 1862. It is not known where his body is buried.

Richard McCaslin writes in his book, 'Tainted Breeze', this about Eli S. Thomas: "Thomas, the physician who had been initiated by Crisp at his shop in August, also wrote to the jurors on October 18, asking them to reconsider his case. He named four witnesses, including Crisp, who could clear him if they were allowed to speak, but the jury refused to consider new testimony. Thomas even promised to help implicate others if released, but in vain. He wrote a will on October 19, in which he reflected sadly on the "uncertainty of this frail and transitory life" and left all his possessions to his wife, Susan, and their children, before climbing on the wagon to ride to his hanging."
Eli S. Thomas Will
Cooke County, Texas Wills, Vol 1, pg 324-325

The State of Texas
County of Cooke
In the name of God Amen. I, Eli S. Thomas of the County of Cooke State aforesaid being of sound mind and memory and considering the uncertainty of this frail and transitory life do therefore make and ordain publish and declare this to be my last will and testament, that is to say first after all my lawful debts are paid and discharged, the residue of my estate real and personal, I give bequeath and dispose of all as follows to wit, To my beloved wife Susan Mary Thomas during her natural life, and to my son Owen Cadmus and my daughter Mary Alice for their use and benefit.
Likewise, I make constitute and appoint my wife Susan Mary Thomas Guardian and Administratrix of this my last Will and Testament, hereby revoking all former wills by me made.
I further wish that my estate may not be probated.
In witness whereof I hereunto subscribe my name and affix my seal using scroll this 19th day of October AD 1862.
Eli S. Thomas
Sworn and subscribed before me the undersighned authority this 19th day of October AD 1862 in the Town of Gainesville.
Sam'l Gooding, Clerk

Monday, November 24, 2008

Under the Rebel Flag

The Texas State Library and Archives Commission has a great website about life in Texas during the Civil War. The website is called UNDER THE REBEL FLAG.

Under the Rebel Flag -- Life in Texas During the Civil War
http://dev.texshare.edu/exhibits/civilwar/index.html
http://dev.texshare.edu/exhibits/civilwar/dissent.html

Friday, November 21, 2008

William R. Rhodes Pardon?

A descendant of the William Rhodes family sent this comment:

"William R. Rhodes was husband of Amanda Lindsey, youngest dau of Charles and Polly Lindsey... The story in our family is that Amanda Lindsey wrote letters to officials of Texas, and finally gained a pardon and acquittal for William R. Rhodes (sometimes spelled Rhoades and even Rodes)."

We would very interested to know if Amanda Lindsey Rhodes was granted a pardon and acquittal for her husband, William R. Rhodes. Anyone live in the Austin area that can do some research in the State Archives and report back?

Tuesday, November 18, 2008

Eli Scott Descendants


A descendant of Eli M. Scott has sent the following information:

Thank you so much for the information on Eli Scott.
Here is what I know about my family:
1860 Census
Eli Scott (49) B. in TN 1811
Maria Scott (white ) (24) B.KY 1835
married @1850
Children
1.Amanda M.K.Scott B.1852 AR
2.Caledonia C. V. Scott B 1856,AR
3.Celeta A.M. Scott B. 1858 AR
4. John W. Scott (16) B.1844 AR
5. Zac T. Scott (12) B. 1848 AR
1870 Census:
Maria Scott (36) (Black) B. KY (At that time Indians were listed as Black and since all the children were listed as white, we think Maria was an Indian)
(**note: Census taker could have made a mistake when putting a "B" by her name on the census form.)
Children
1. Amanda (17) (White) B.AR
2.Caledonia (24) (White) B. AR
3.Seleda (12) (White) B.AR
*4. William (9) (White) B.TX
5.Jacob (5) (White) B TX
William mar. Nancy Elizabeth Cox(B. TN 1895)
Children
*1. Harry Scott B. 1895 KS
2.Myrtle May Scott B1898, KS
3.Jennie Edith Scott B.1900 KS
Harry Scott married Lenora Mae Morris
Children
1. Alvin Willard Scott B.30 Dec.1917 Died 9 Nov 2005
2.George Leon Scott B.4 July 1919 Died @Sep 2007
3. Chester Duane "Wayne" Scott B.25 jan 1921 Died 13 Jun1993
* 4.William Dale Scott B.22 Jun 1923 Married Lois May Mathis (Died 6 Feb 2003)
Married Delores Lerner (Died @Mar 2006)

Eli M. Scott Family

Eli M. Scott Family
1. Eli M. Scott 1,2,3,4,5,6 was born about 1811 in Tennessee. He was hanged on 13 Oct 1862 in Gainesville, Cooke, Texas as a victim of "The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas, 1862." According to James Lemuel Clark, Scott was buried7 in Cooke County, Texas on the "Rhodes survey, now (1916-1926) owned by Sam McClerran".
Clark states that Eli Scott was from California, but McCaslin states the following: “Clark, recalled that Scott came to Texas from California, but on June 1, 1858, Scott sold his possessions located in Scott County, Arkansas -- 5 horses, 50 or 60 cattle, 2 wagons, 8 to 10 sheep and some furniture -- to F.M. Scott, a woman, for $800. (Cooke Cty. Deed Record, V, 577) He purchased 220 acres soon thereafter, because he paid taxes in Cooke County on this land in 1861 and 1862, when he also paid taxes on 8 horses and 9 cattle.” (Note: It is possible that Eli Scott was in California for a short period of time, but we have found no record of him there.)

Eli married (1) Sarah Erwin on 23 Nov 1835 in , Shelby , Tennessee. Sarah died about 1850.
Eli had the following known children from the first marriage:
1. John W. Scott was born in 1844 in , , Arkansas.
2. Zac T. Scott was born in 1848 in , , Arkansas.
(note: There are probably more children from this marriage. There marriage was in 1835 and first known child born in 1855.)
Where was the Eli Scott family in the 1850 census?

Eli married (2) Maria 8,9 about 1850. Maria was born about 1835 in Kentucky. They had three daughters by 1860. The family can be found in the 1860 Cooke County, Texas census (below).
Who is the 23 year old 'Doctor Scott' next to Eli Scott in the census?

1860 Census
After her husband was killed in the Great Hanging at Gainesville, Maria Scott moves her family to Waco, McLennan County, Texas by the 1870 Census (shown below). In addition to their three daughters, Maria had two sons in the household by the 1870 census: William who is 9 years old and Jacob who is 5. How did Maria have a child 5 years old in the 1870 census, when her husband died in October 1862. Maria may have been just barely expecting when her husband was killed in the hanging in October 1862. The child would have been born in June of 1863 -- making the child at least 6 or 7 in the 1870 census. Or she could have had a child from another father. One wonders how vulnerable these poor widows were after losing their husbands.
What happened to Maria and her children after 1870? Where are they in the 1880 census?

1870 Census

Eli and Maria had the following children:
1. Amanda M. R. Scott was born about 1852 in Arkansas.
2. Caledonia C. V. Scott was born about 1856 in Arkansas.
3. Celeta A. M. G. Scott was born about 1858 in Arkansas.
4. William M. Scott 10 was born in Dec 1861 in Texas.
William married Nancy Elizabeth Cox about 1895. Nancy was born in Jul 1859 TN. William can be found in the 1900 Cowley County, Kansas census.
5. Jacob Scott was born about 1864 in Texas.

Where are the children after 1870? We only have information on one of the children -- William. Did the other children marry? If so, who are their spouses and where did they live?

Sources
1. Clark, James Lemuel; Edited by L.D. Clark, Civil War Recollections of James Lemuel Clark , Texas A&M University Press, College Stateion, Texas 77843, ISBN 0-89096-205-7
"After some concideration I will rite a brief statement an give the fact in regard to the 44 good men that was murderd by a mob in Gainesville, Cooke County, Texas in October 1862, as I no more a bout the men then eney body else now in this country. Will say tha were murderd for there Union princeables... One of our near neighbors was William Rhodes. He (came) from North Carolina here, an got 320 acres of land as a homestead from the state. He had a nice familey an his oaldest boy belong to the same company that I belonged to. Now Rhodes sold land to a man by the name of Eli Scott a bout the time the war started. An Scott moved to the land an was murderd while he lived on the land. He Scott (came) from California here, an had a big famley, and was nice foalks. Him an Rhodes were hung the same day. Tha are boath buried on the Rhodes survey, now owned by Sam McClerran."
2. "One of forty-two Union sympathizing citizens of North Texas who were charged with treason against the Confederacy by a Citizens Court in Gainesville, Cooke County in October 1862 and then executed in the Great Hanging at Gainesville. References: 1. Richard B. McCaslin, "Tainted Breeze, The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas, 1862" (Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Louisiana State University Press, 1994). 2. George W. Diamond, "Account of the Great Hanging at Gainesville, 1862" SOUTHWESTERN HISTORICAL QUARTERLY, Vol. 66, no. 3, January, 1963, p. 331-414, edited by Sam Acheson and Julie Ann Hudson O'Connell. 3. James L. Clark, "Civil War Recollections of James Lemuel Clark, Including Previously Unpublished Material On The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas In October, 1862" (College Station, Texas: Texas A&M University Press, 1984).".
3. George Washington Diamond's Account of the Great Hanging at Gainesville, 1862, ManuscripteEdited by Sam Acheson and Julie, The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Vol. LXVI, January, 1963, No. 3, pages 331-414, pg .397.George W. Diamond was a brother of secessionists, John R. Diamond and James J. Diamond, who was a principal in the Great Hanging. After the hangings and the adjournment of the court, Diamond was given the records for the purpose of "preserving them and so disposing of them that the history of its (Citizen's Court) transactions might be perpetuated and justice done to those who participated in its deliberations. Diamond's compilation of "memoranda" was to be offered to the public as a just vindicaton of the conduct of those whose judgements were under national criticism. The members of the court examined Diamond's account and gave their unanimous and unqualified approval."pg 397 The State vs. C. A. Jones("HumpBack"), James Powers ("Carpenter"), Eli M. Scott, Thomas Baker ("Old Man"), Geo W Anderson, Abraham McNeese, Henry Cochran ("30"), C.F. Anderson, Wm Wernell, B.F. Barnes ("35 or 40"), Wm Rodes, and N. M. Clark ("25"). Disloyalty & Treason.The testimony against the above mentioned conspirators corresponds with the testimony herein before produced on the trial of Childs, Fields, Harper, Lock, and others. They all acknowledged their connection with the organization, and made full confession of their guilt at the gallows
4. 1860 U.S. Census, Texas, Cooke, Gainesville P.O., pg6, hh 97/99. "Name: Eli Scott Age in 1860: 49 Birth Year: abt 1811 Birthplace: Tennessee Home in 1860: Cooke, Texas Post Office: Gainesville Value of real estate: $440; Value of personal estate: $447
Household Members: Eli Scott, 49, m, farmer, 440/447, Tennessee; Maria Scott, 24, f, Kentucky; Amanda M R Scott, 7, Arkansas; Calidona C V Scott, 4, Arkansas; Celeta A M G Scott, 1, Arkansas; John W Scott, 16, Arkansas; Zac t Scott, 12, Arkansas. Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: , Cooke, Texas; Roll: M653_1291; Page: 227."
5. Tax Records."Cooke County, Texas1857: Poll Tax 1861: Tax on land (220 acres)1862: Tax on land, 8 horses, 9 cattle."
6. McCaslin, Richard B., Tainted Breeze, The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas, 1862 , Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Louisiana State University Press, 1993. xvi, 234 pp. Intro. App. Illus. Map. Index., page 203. "Scott...paid his first poll tax in Cooke County in 1857. His neighbor, James L. Clark, recalled that Scott came to Texas from California, but on June 1, 1858, Scott sold his possessions located in Scott County, Arkansas -- 5 horses, 50 or 60 cattle, 2 wagons, 8 to 10 sheep and some furniture -- to F.M. Scott, a woman, for $800. (Cooke Cty. Deed Record, V, 577) He purchased 220 acres soon thereafter, because he paid taxes in Cooke County on this land in 1861 and 1862, when he also paid taxes on 8 horses and 9 cattle."
7. Clark, James Lemuel; Edited by L.D. Clark, Civil War Recollections of James Lemuel Clark ."Page 109 Tha (William R. Rhodes & Eli Scott) are boath buried on the Rhodes survey, now owned by Sam McClerran."
8. 1860 U.S. Census, Texas, Cooke, Gainesville P.O., pg 6, hh 97/99. "Name: Eli Scott Age in 1860: 49 Birth Year: abt 1811 Birthplace: Tennessee Home in 1860: Cooke, Texas Post Office: Gainesville Value of real estate: $440; Value of personal estate: $447Household Members: Name Age Eli Scott, 49, m, farmer, 440/447, Tennessee Maria Scott, 24, f, KentuckyAmanda M R Scott, 7, ArkansasCalidona C V Scott, 4, ArkansasCeleta A M G Scott, 1, ArkansasJohn W Scott, 16, ArkansasZac t Scott, 12, ArkansasSource Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: , Cooke, Texas; Roll: M653_1291; Page: 227; Image: 464."
9. 1870 U.S. Census, Texas, West of Brazos, McLennan, Waco "Name: Maria Scott Estimated Birth Year: abt 1834 Age in 1870: 36 Birthplace: Arkansas Home in 1870: West of The Brazos River, McLennan, Texas Post Office: Waco Maria Scott, 36, f, b, keeping house, KentuckyAmanda Scott, 17, f, w, ArkansasCaledonia Scott, 14, f, w, ArkansasSeleda Scott, 12, f, w, ArkansasWilliam Scott, 9, m, w, TexasJacob Scott, 5, m, w, TexasSource Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: West of The Brazos River, McLennan, Texas; Roll: M593_1598; Page: 136; Image: 268."
10. 1900 U.S. Census, Kansas, Cowley, Winfield.

Sunday, November 16, 2008

Honoring Those Who Died

On Sunday, October 19, 1862, the final nineteen victims of the Gainesville Hanging were hanged.
So last month, on Sunday, October 19th, several of us who are descendants visited the Georgia Davis Bass Park, the location of the Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas 1862. Sunday, October 19th was chosen because that is when our ancestor and 18 other men were hanged. We don't know the exact location on Pecan Creek where their bodies were buried, so we left flowers and flags at the historical marker in the park.

The burial place for most of these men was along the banks of Pecan Creek. No headstones were ever placed on any of the graves of the men who were buried there along the creek. There could be over thirty (30+) men who are buried there. Even though there are no headstones to mark the exact grave sites, that area along Pecan creek is considered a cemetery or sacred ground by all of us who are descendants of one of the victims of the Gainesville Hanging.
There are only five known grave sites for the victims of the Gainesville Hanging. An earlier post (http://gainesvilletx1862.blogspot.com/2008/08/where-are-they-buried.html) listed the known and suggested burial places.

This last picture is on the opposite side of the historical marker and is looking toward the bridge.

Sunday, November 9, 2008

Not Just A Name On A List

In October 1862, 40 men died, breathing their last breath with a rope around their neck. Several others died from gunshot wounds.
Every man who died during the Gainesville Hangings is important and not just because their name is on a list.  Behind every name written on the list was a real person.  These were men with hopes and dreams -- men with families and loved ones. Most came to Texas hoping for a better future for themselves and their families. Instead, they met a premature death at the end of a rope and their family was left alone on the Texas frontier.
They had wives, children, parents, brothers, sisters, cousins, aunts, uncles and friends who grieved when they died. Many of the men were connected to each other by blood or marriage. Several large extended family groups lost several loved ones during the hanging. Their sorrow was inconsolable. We have made lists of the men who died during the hanging and of their wives -- these lists were made to help facilitate our research. Please remember that each and every man and woman on these lists was a unique human being and not just a name on a list.