Thursday, December 4, 2008

Lydia Field McCool "Much esteemed for her modesty, beauty and virtuous refinement"

Lydia Field was the daughter of  Henry Field and Jane Augustine Potter. Lydia was born 12 Dec 1845 in Iowa. She moved with her father and step-mother, Mary Ann Bail, to Texas in about 1856. The family is found living in Cooke County, Texas in 1860. Lydia's father, Henry Field, is listed as a 45 year old shoemaker with no real estate and $800 personal estate value.

When Lydia is 15 years old, she married William McCool (17 Feb 1861 Cooke County, Texas).
According to McCaslin, Lydia allegedly eloped with William McCool and then they settled nearby. McCool "joined William C. Twitty's company during May, 1861, in Gainesville, but never reported for mustering. He paid taxes in 1862 in Cooke County on two cattle, and that summer joined Randolph's Partisan Battalion."

William McCool, along with two others from Randolph's command, A. N. Johnson and John M. Cottrell, were captured by James D. Young. After a confederate court martial presided over by Randolph, all three men were found guilty of treason against the Confederacy and hanged at the Young's Red River home.

Lydia Field McCool lost both her husband and father as a result of trials and hangings. Lydia's father, Henry, wrote a will the day before he was hanged. Henry left to his daughter, Lydia, the following: "three cows and calves also one colt known as the Roan Filley for her own use and benefit."

Diamond's Account of the Great Hanging states this about the McCools:

"William McCool, who was hung with Johnson and Cottrell, was the son-in-law of Henry Fields, who was hung early after the organization of the Court.
Mrs. McCool, the daughter of Fields, is a lady much esteemed for her modesty, beauty and virtuous refinement. She was attached to her husband by the strongest ties of affection. But a short time previous she had secretly abandoned her father's roof, to join her destiny to her bold and determined lover. How sad and melancholly the reflection that she who loved so well could not have loved more wisely. Or why could he not, 'Taste the honey, and not wound the flower.'"

George Washington Diamond's Account of the Great Hanging at Gainesville, 1862, Manuscript Edited by Sam Acheson and Julie, The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Vol. LXVI, January, 1963, No. 3, pages 404.

Go to an update on Lydia Field McCool.

Lynching or Hanging

Was the "Great Hanging at Gainesville" a Hanging or Lynching??

LYNCHING
A lynching is when a few people (often a vigilance committee) decide the punishment for another person or persons. It is an execution (usually by hanging) without the due process of law, often under the pretext of service to justice, race or tradition.
The victim of the lynching may or may not have committed a crime. The ringleaders or social elite would rile up a crowd or vigilance committee, who would then feel justified because of the assumed guilt of the victim. The leaders and members of the vigilante committee would often serve as prosecutor, judge, jury and executioner. The issue of the victim's guilt was secondary to the passions and objectives of the accusers. Measures taken by vigilance committees often resorted to hasty injustice and were at best extralegal . In early Texas, it was often considered a form "frontier justice" and was more common in areas where there was not an established legal system.

HANGING
A hanging follows due process under the Rule of Law. It involves a trial in a legal court of law with a judge and jury. It has many rules of evidence. The defense gets to face the accusers. The accused is assumed innocent until proven guilty in a legal court of law.

The Handbook of Texas Online states this:"The stresses of the Civil War, such as racism, regional loyalties, political factionalism, economic tension, and the growth of the abolition movement, inured people to violence in a way that seemed to make lynching increasingly easy to contemplate. War-generated tensions produced the greatest mass lynching in the history of the state, the Great Hanging at Gainesville, when vigilantes hanged forty-one suspected Unionists during a thirteen-day period in October 1862. "

Friday, November 28, 2008

Henry Cockrum Family Update

Below is the information gathered so far on the Henry Cockrum family. Any additional information, corrections or comments would be appreciated.

Henry Cockrum 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 was born about 1831 in Missouri. Henry lived in Fannin County, Texas in 1850. He purchased land in Cooke County in 1858. By 1860, Henry had moved his family to the Choctaw Nation (Indian Lands). He was back in Cooke County by 1862. He died on 13 Oct 1862 in Gainesville, Cooke, Texas as a victim of "The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas 1862".

Question?? The 1860 Census has children in the household that don't seem to fit into the family. Were these extra children in the household, nieces & nephews, grandchildren, foster kids, or did they belong to Henry & Elizabeth? In the 1900 Census, Elizabeth states she gave birth to 6 children and 4 where still living. We need help figuring out all the children!!

Henry married13 Elizabeth Lackey Petell Jones 9,10,11,12, called "Lizzy,"on 19 May 1849 in Fannin County, Texas. Henry was her third husband. Elizabeth was born on 6 Mar 1820 in Kentucky.
Elizabeth was first married to John Petell. After he died, she married a second time to (unknown given-name) Jones. On her marriage record to Henry Cockrum, she is listed as Elizabeth Jones.
By 1870, Elizabeth had moved her family to Lawrence County, Missouri. In 1900, she is living with a grand-daughter in Indian Territory. She died on 10 Apr 1906 in Oil Center, Pontotoc, Oklahoma. She was buried in Box X Cemetery, Pontotoc, Oklahoma.

Henry and Elizabeth had the following children:
i. Amanda Cockrum was born on 2 Apr 1850 in Texas. She died14 on 8 Feb 1921 in El Reno, Canadian, Oklahoma.
Amanda married (1) William Martin Elliott 15,16 on 20 May 1866 in , Cooke, Texas. William was born about 1838. He died on 14 May 1875 in , Cooke, Texas. Mande and William lived near the Red River where William ran a ferry boat at Horse Shoe Bend (now in Lake Texoma). William was murdered 14 May 1875 while trying to collect a debt.
Amanda married (2) James Franklin Meler on 7 Jun 1877 in Cooke Co., Texas. James was born in Dec 1856 in Alabama. He died17 on 3 Oct 1923 in El Reno, Canadian Co., Oklahoma.
ii. Lucinda Cockrum was born on 17 Oct 1854 in Texas. She died on 25 Jun 1921 in Oklahoma. She was buried in Rosedale Cemetery, Ada, Pontotoc, Oklahoma.
Lucinda married Franklin Travis Jones about 1878 in Texas. Franklin was born on 13 Apr 1853 in Grayson, Texas.
iii. William Henry Cockrum was born about 1856 in Texas. He died in May 1889 in Dexter, Cooke, Texas.
William married Alveria Harriet Ford on 22 Jul 1875 in Cooke, Texas. Alveria was born in Apr 1859.
iv. Edward Cockrum was born on 17 Dec 1860 in Cooke, Texas. He died18 on 23 Apr 1924 in Joplin, Jasper, Missouri.
Edward married (1) Joycie F. Morton . Joycie was born on 18 Aug 1855 in Granby, Newton, Missouri. She died on 2 Dec 1913 in Joplin, Jasper, Missouri.
Edward married (2) Mary Smith .

Elizabeth was first married to John Petell on 8 Feb 1838 in , Pike, Illinois.
Elizabeth and John had the following known children:
v. John W. Petell was born about 1843 in Illinois.
vi. M. Petell, a female, was born about 1839 in Illinois.
Could this be the 22 year old Malvina in the 1860 census???

Elizabeth then married second husband, (unknown given-name) Jones about 1846.
They had one known child – a daughter born about 1848. She was listed as “A. Jones” in the 1850 census.
vii. A. Jones , a female, was born about 1848 in Texas.

Sources
1. Gainesville Great Hanging Sources."One of forty Union sympathizing citizens of North Texas who were charged with treason against the Confederacy by a Citizens Court in Gainesville, Cooke County in October 1862 and then executed in the Great Hanging at Gainesville.References:1. Richard B. McCaslin, "Tainted Breeze, The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas, 1862" (Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Louisiana State University Press, 1994).2. George W. Diamond, "Account of the Great Hanging at Gainesville, 1862" SOUTHWESTERN HISTORICAL QUARTERLY, Vol. 66, no. 3, January, 1963, p. 331-414, edited by Sam Acheson and Julie Ann Hudson
O'Connell.3. James L. Clark, "Civil War Recollections of James Lemuel Clark, Including Previously Unpublished Material On The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas In October, 1862" (College Station, Texas: Texas A&M University Press, 1984).".
2. George Washington Diamond's Account of the Great Hanging at Gainesville, 1862, ManuscripteEdited by Sam Acheson and Julie, The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Vol. LXVI, January, 1963, No. 3, pages 331-414, pg .397.George W. Diamond was a brother of secessionists, John R. Diamond and James J. Diamond, who was a principal in the Great Hanging. After the hangings and the adjournment of the court, Diamond was given the records for the purpose of "preserving them and so disposing of them that the history of its (Citizen's Court) transactions might be perpetuated and justice done to those who participated in its deliberations. Diamond's compilation of "memoranda" was to be offered to the public as a just vindicaton of the conduct of those whose judgements were under national criticism. The members of the court examined Diamond's account and gave their unanimous and unqualified approval."pg 397The State vs. C. A. Jones("HumpBack"), James Powers ("Carpenter"), Eli M. Scott, Thomas Baker ("Old Man"), Geo W Anderson, Abraham McNeese, Henry Cochran ("30"), C.F. Anderson, Wm Wernell, B.F. Barnes ("35 or 40"), Wm Rodes, and N. M. Clark ("25").Disloyalty & Treason.The testimony against the above mentioned conspirators corresponds with the testimony herein before produced on the trial of Childs, Fields, Harper, Lock, and others. They all acknowledged their connection with the organization, and made full confession of their guilt at the gallows.===pg 398 Witness in trial against Ramey DayBen F. Barnes sworn.(Witness)I was at the meeting at Richie's Mill. Dr. Foster said the object of the meeting was to resue Harper; and he wanted us to take our guns and go -- myself and Ramey Dye. The reason we did not go to rescue Harper was because a messenger (Essman) told us that there were a great many soldiers in Gainesville and we were then afraid."
3. Connor, Seymour V. , Peters Colony of Texas, A History and Biographical Sketches of the Early Settlers, Texas State Historical Association; Austin; 1959."page 222 "Henry Cockrum was issued a certificate by the county court of Cooke County for 640 acres. Since his claim was later disallowed, it is doubtful that he was a bona fide colonist."(**note: There is also a Edward Cockrum listed as receiving a certificate for 320 acres in Cooke County and in 1857 having his claim also disallowed.)."
4. Probate Record, Cooke County Probate Book 1, page 380-381, Sep 1863."Cooke County Probate Book 1, page 380-381, 5 September 1863(bottom of page 380 and continuing on top of page 381)Appraisement Bill of the Community property of Henry Cockrum, Decd70 head of sheep @ $4 280.0035 head of stock cattle @$9 315.001 Yoke of Oxen $100 & 19 head of horses @ $80 1620.001span mules $400 & 1 bay horse $200 600.002 head of hogs @ $10 160 acres of land @$2 340.00160 acres of land & improvements 250.002 setts of harnes & one wagon 175.00Farming tools $25 2 log chains $14 39.001 corss but saw $10 1 box of tools $15 35.001 note $80 Debt on Doct Martin $350 430.00
1 block $25 Household furniture $150 175.002 steers @ $40 80.00 Total $4,329.00Page 381The State of TexasCounty of CookeThis is to certify that I have made a true and correct exhibit of all the property belonging to the estate of Henry Cockrum Decd, that has come to my knowledge.Elizabeth CockrumSworn to subscribed before me this 28th day of September AD 1863Saml Gooding, Clerk."
5. 1850 U.S. Census, Texas, Fannin County, Household #1, pg 142."In the 1850 Fannin County, Texas census, household #1Henry (Harry) Cockran, age 19, farmer, born MissouriElizabeth Cockran, age 26, born KentuckyA. Cockran, age 2/12 months, female, born TexasJno. W. Petell, age 6, born IllinoisM. Petell age 10, female, born IllinoisA. Jones, age 2, female, born Texas."
6. Land/Deed Records."Cooke County Deed Records3 July 1858Purchased 160 acres8 July 1858Purchased 100 acres."
7.
1860 U.S. Census, Choctaw Nation, Indian Lands, Arkansas.
"Name: Henry Cockram Age in 1860: 28 Birth Year: abt 1832 Birthplace: Missouri Home in 1860: Choctaw Nation, Indian Lands, Arkansas Gender: Male Value of real estate: Household Members: Name Age
Henry Cockram, 28 Elizabeth Cockram, 36 Malvina Cockram, 22 Isafena Cockram, 13 Susana Cockram, 9 Luanda Cockram, 8 Wm Henry Cockram, 5 Edward Cockram, 3 Catharine Cockram. 6 Malinda Cockram, 5 Manuel Cockram, 4 John Hoosier, 8.12 Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Choctaw Nation, Indian Lands, Arkansas; Roll: M653_52; Page: 1211; Image: 740.Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Eighth Census of the United States, 1860. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860. M653,."
8. Family Information."I am sorry it has taken me so long to get this out to you. I have had a very_busy couple of weeks._I am attaching six family group sheets for William Henry Cockrum, his_children and grandchildren._My husband's family descends through Amanda Cockrum Meler's daughter Alice._Alice was quite a person in her younger years. As a result Amanda raised_Novva Cockran (one of Alice's marriages was to William Cockran-no relation)._This is my husband's grandmother. She lived to be 100 years old. Amanda had told her that she watched her father hang and Novva passed this story down to the family. I have corresponded with a few Meler relatives and a few_Elliot relatives so I know there are many descendants out there._The information on Preston, Isom and some on William Henry comes from "A_History of the Cockrum Family in America" by Emmett Cockrum. There is a_family that is posted on Ancestry that has a different ancestry for William_Henry. I have not done enough research on this family to know which I think_is correct._I have a copy of the marriage cert for William and Elizabeth Jones. Given_that there were children in the census named Peters and Jones, it is_possible that Elizabeth was married before. The cert does not identify her_as Mrs. Jones. They could have been taking care of others children also._Elizabeth is buried in Box X Cemetery, Pontotoc County, OK. Amanda and Frank_Meler are buried in El Reno, OK. I have copies of the records from the Cooke_County Courthouse regarding the property left by William Henry. William_Henry filed for land in Fannin County. William Henry, Elizabeth and family_are in the Fannin County census in 1850 and Jacks Fork, Indian Territory_census in 1860. _If I come across anything else I will let you know. It has been several_years since I have worked on this family line. Please let me know if these_come through alright and if there is anything else I can do._R. Sheppard."
9. 1850 U.S. Census, Texas, Fannin County, Household #1, pg 142."In the 1850 Fannin County, Texas census, household #1Henry (Harry) Cockran, age 19, farmer, born MissouriElizabeth Cockran, age 26, born KentuckyA. Cockran, age 2/12 months, female, born TexasJno. W. Petell, age 6, born IllinoisM. Petell age 10, female, born IllinoisA. Jones, age 2, female, born Texas."
10. 1860 U.S. Census, Choctaw Nation, Indian Lands, Arkansas. "Name: Henry Cockram Age in 1860: 28 Birth Year: abt 1832 Birthplace: Missouri Home in 1860: Choctaw Nation, Indian Lands, Arkansas Gender: Male; Value of real estate: Household Members: Name Age Henry Cockram, 28 Elizabeth Cockram, 36 Malvina Cockram, 22 Isafena Cockram, 13 Susana Cockram, 9 Luanda Cockram, 8 Wm Henry Cockram, 5 Edward Cockram, 3 Catharine Cockram. 6 Malinda Cockram, 5 Manuel Cockram, 4 John Hoosier, 8.12 Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Choctaw Nation, Indian Lands, Arkansas; Roll: M653_52; Page: 1211; Image: 740.Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Eighth Census of the
United States, 1860. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860. M653,."
11.
1870 U.S. Census, Mount Pleasant, Lawrence, Missouri.
"Name: Elizabeth Cochrum Estimated Birth Year: abt 1821 Age in 1870: 49 Birthplace: Kentucky Home in 1870: Mount Pleasant, Lawrence, Missouri Post Office: Mount Vernon Race: White Gender: Female Value of real estate: No Real Estate
Household Members: Name Age Elizabeth Cochrum, 49 Susan Cochrum, 17 Lucinda Cochrum, 16 William H Cochrum, 13 Edward Cochrum, 11 Malinda Petell, 14 John Petell, 10 (Note: Who are the Petell children? Elizabeth’s children by John Petell are listed in the 1850 census for the Cockrum family. Could these Petell children be Elizabeth's grandchildren from the 10 year old female in the 1850 census??) Source Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: Mount Pleasant, Lawrence, Missouri; Roll: M593_787; Page: 458; Image: 86.Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2003. Original data: 1870."
12. 1900 U.S. Census, Township 4, Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory; page 41, ED 120, 7 Jul 1900. "Note: Living with granddaughter's family, Annie McCurry, daugther of Lucinda Jones.Name: Lizzy Cochran Home in 1900: Township 4, Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory Age: 81 Born: Mar 1819; Birthplace: Kentucky Race: White; Relationship to head-of-house: Mother-in-law (should read grandmother-in-law)Household Members: Name Age Daniel McCurry, 29 Annie McCurry, 19 Arthur McCurry, 4 Myrtle McCurry, 1 Lizzy Cochran, 81, Mar 1819, widowed, 6 births 4 living, Kentucky, Kentucky, Kentucky Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Township 4, Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory; Roll: T623 1846; .Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623."
13. Marriage Record, Texas Marriage Collection, 1814-1909; Ancestry.com. "Name: Henry Cochrum Marriage Date: 19 May 1849 Spouse: Elizabeth Jones Marriage County: Fannin Marriage State: Texas Source: Texas Marriages, 1814-1909 Source Information: Ancestry.com. Texas Marriage Collection, 1814-1909 and 1966-2002 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005."
14. Cemetery Records."Amanda is buried in El Reno, OK's only cemetery next to her husband. They are buried in the old section,
Block 39, Lot 4, Grave C."
15. Family Tradition & Stories. "It was at Dexter,Tx that William ran the Ferryboat. Martin Elliott Jr is my GG Grandfather and I have the data to show my Great X (10) Grandparents. Rabourn Elliott was also a brother to William Elliott and he was my Great grand father and he married Elvoria (Elvira) Brown (Elliott) he too ran the Ferryboat and died in 1875 Cooke Co Tx. Willim Elliott had been killed by horse thiefs and ones that owed him a debt. We have proof of this and it is on his Grave marker at Burneyville,Ok. When Rabour died, that left my Grandfather to run the Dexter Ferryboat along with my Grandmother Annie Jane Hilton (Elliott) His name, Doc McHenry Elliott and like to be called Big Doc Elliott. He was thirteen years old when he began to run the Ferryboat. I have articles on Him and my grandmother. They called him "The Riverboat Man" and Her "The Boat Woman" She loved the River and didnt want to leave and go back to Love Co Marietta, Oklahoma where they both lived and died. Most of the Elliotts are in that part of the country today. My Grandpa Doc was forced to take Bonnie and Clyde Parker (outlaws) over into Texas by means of the Red River. He use to lay around on the porch and tell me the stories.From Cockrum Genforum."
16. Family Tradition & Stories. "Mande and William lived near the Red River where William ran a ferry boat at Horse Shoe Bend (now in Lake Texoma). William was murdered 14 May 1875 while trying to collect a debt."
17. Cemetery Records ."Amanda is buried in El Reno, OK's only cemetery next to her husband. They are buried in the old section, Block 39, Lot 4, Grave C."
18. Death Certificate, http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/resources/deathcertificates/."Missouri Death Certificate Edward Cockrum Death: April 23, 1924, Jasper Joplin 11619 Birth: December 17, 1860, Cooke County, Texas Father: Wm Cockrum Mother: unknown Informant: Mary Cockrum (2nd wife to Edward)."

Tuesday, November 25, 2008

More on Eli S. Thomas & Family

Susan Mary Hedenburg, wife of Eli Sigler Thomas.
She went by her middle name of "Mary" in most records.
Susan Mary Hedenburg was born 19 SEP 1828 in Kentucky. She was the daughter of Peter Cadmus HEDENBERG (b: 23 SEP 1790 in New York City) and Susan M. SPENCER (b: 6 NOV 1803 in New York City). As a youth, her family moved to Jacksonville, Morgan County, Illinois. Her father was a harness maker and "saddler".
Susan Mary married Eli Thomas on 6 Apr 1853 in Morgan County, Illinois. They had two children: Owen Cadmus THOMAS (b: 15 AUG 1854 in Iowa) and Mary Alice (Allie) THOMAS (b: 22 MAY 1858 in Texas.)
After her husband Eli S. Thomas was killed in the Gainesville Hangings, she married William C. HAYS on 3 MAY 1863 in Grayson County, Texas. They had one son. William Hays died in 1880. Susan Mary died in 1898.
Her obituary reads:
Mrs. S. M. Hays died the 31st day of March, 1898. She was sick 11 days. She was born September 1, 1828, in Kentucky. Her father, Peter Hedenberg moved to Jacksonville, Ill, when she was quite small, where she was raised. In April 5, 1853 she was married to Eli S. Thomas and lived with him till October 19, 1862, when he died. She married William. C. Hays May 3, 1863. He died in 1880. She had been a consistent member of the Christian Church since she was 22years old. Barton Stone baptized her. She was a loving mother and good and kind to every one. She took great delight in reading this paper. She lived with her only daughter. She leaves two sons and one daughter and a host of neighbors and friends to mourn her loss. What was our loss was gain.
Mrs. A. Sloan, Mangum, Oklahoma

She is buried in Newport Cemetery, Jack County, Texas, next to her second husband and her two oldest children. The cemetery is located N of Newport, Texas, about 0.5 miles N on CR 1288, E of road.
Hays, Susan Mary, Sep 19, 1828, Mar 31, 1898, 3, 23
Hays, Wm. Carrel, Aug 17, 1817, 1892, 3, 23,
Thomas, Owen C., Aug 15, 1854, Apr 11, 1936, 3, 23
Thomas, Nancy J., Aug 21, 1860, May 22, 1936, 3, 23
Sloan, Mary Alice, May 22, 1858, Oct 22, 1926, 3, 23

Eli S. Thomas Family
Doctor Eli Sigler Thomas 1,2,3,4,5 was born about 1823 in Ohio. He died on 19 Oct 1862 in the Great Hanging at Gainesville, Cooke County, Texas.
Eli married7 Susan Mary Hedenberg 6 on 6 Apr 1853 in Morgan, Illinois. Susan was born on 1 Sep 1828 in Kentucky. She died8 on 31 Mar 1898 in Texas. She was buried9 in Newport Cemetery, Jack, Texas.
They had the following children:
1. Owen Cadmus Thomas 10 was born on 15 Aug 1854 in Iowa - probably in Lee County, Iowa. He died11 on 11 Apr 1936 in Wichita, Texas. He was buried12 in Newport Cemetery, Jack Texas.
Owen married Nancy Jane Hughey . Nancy was born on 21 Aug 1860 in Fayetteville, Alabama. She died13 on 22 May 1936 in Wichita Falls, Wichita, Texas. She was buried14 in Newport Cemetery, Jack Texas.
2. Mary Alice Thomas "Allie" was born on 22 May 1858 in Texas. She died on 22 Oct 1926. She was buried15 in Newport Cemetery, Jack Texas.
Mary married Arthur M. Sloan . Arthur was born on 24 Jul 1859. He died on 13 Oct 1890. He was buried16 in Newport Cemetery, Jack Texas.

Sources
1. 1860 U.S. Census, Texas, Cooke County, Gainesville, hh 375/387."Name: Eli Thomas Age in 1860: 37 Birth Year: abt 1823 Birthplace: Ohio Home in 1860: Cooke, Texas; Post Office: Gainesville Value of real estate: $2,000; Value of personal estate: $8,460Occupation: M.D.Household Members: Name Age Eli Thomas, 37, Ohio Mary Thomas, 31, KentuckyOwen C Thomas, 6, IowaMary A Thomas, 9, Texas Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: , Cooke, Texas; Roll: M653_1291; Page: 246; Image: 501."
2. Will, Cooke County, Texas Wills, Vol 1, pg 324-325, 19 Oct 1862."The State of TexasCounty of CookeIn the name of God Amen. I, Eli S. Thomas of the County of Cooke State aforesaid being of sound mind and memory and considering the uncertainty of this frail and transitory life do therefore make and ordain publish and declare this to be my last will and testament, that is to say first after all my lawful debts are paid and discharged, the residue of my estate real and personal, I give bequeath and dispose of all as follows to wit, To my beloved wife Susan Mary Thomas during her natural life, and to my son Owen Cadmus and my daughter Mary Alice for their use and benefit.Likewise, I make constitute and appoint my wife Susan Mary Thomas Guardian and Administratrix of this my last Will and Testament, hereby revoking all former wills by me made.
I further wish that my estate may not be probated.In witness whereof I hereunto subscribe my name and affix my seal using scroll this 19th day of October AD 1862.Eli S. ThomasSworn and subscribed before me the undersighned authority this 19th day of October AD 1862 in the Town of Gainesville.Sam'l Gooding, Clerk."
3. Family Information." Eli sigler Thomas, a medical doctor from Ohio moved to Illinois where he married April 5 1853 to Susan Mary Hedenberg. They moved to Cooke County, Texas where E. S. Thomas was hanged in what is referred to as the "GreatHanging" in Gainsville, Texas. Reasons for the trial of 40 men who opposed the Confederacy differ. What is known is that none of those convicted owned slaves while the jury members were slave owners. Cooke county had voted against secession from the Union."
4. Gainesville Great Hanging Sources: 1. Richard B. McCaslin, "Tainted Breeze, The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas, 1862" (Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Louisiana State University Press, 1994).2. George W. Diamond, "Account of the Great Hanging at Gainesville, 1862" SOUTHWESTERN HISTORICAL QUARTERLY, Vol. 66, no. 3, January, 1963, p. 331-414, edited by Sam Acheson and Julie Ann Hudson O'Connell.3. James L. Clark, "Civil War Recollections of James Lemuel Clark, Including Previously Unpublished Material On The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas In October, 1862" (College Station, Texas: Texas A&M University Press, 1984).".
5. State Census, Iowa State Census, 1856, Lee County, 1856."Name: Eli S Thomas Census Date: 1856 Residence County: Lee; Residence State: Iowa; Locality: Washington; Birth Location: Ohio; Family Number: 110; Birth Year: abt 1826; Line: 16; Roll: IA_58; Household Members: Eli S Thomas, 30; Mary Thomas, 27; Cadmus Thomas, 1; John Thomas, 39; Wm Van Scyhock, 16. Source Information: Ancestry.com. Iowa State Census Collection, 1836-1925 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2007. Original data: Microfilm of Iowa State Censuses, 1856, 1885, 1895, 1905, 1915, 1925 as well various special censuses from 1836-1897 obtained from the State Historical Society of Iowa via Heritage Quest."
6. 1850 U.S. Census, Illinois, Morgan County, Jacksonville, pg 180.
"21 year old, Mary Hedenberg, is listed in her father's household. He is listed by his first initial, "P"Source Citation: Year: 1850; Census Place: Jacksonville, Morgan, Illinois; Roll: M432_122; Page: 180;."
7. Marriage Record, http://www.ilsos.gov/GenealogyMWeb/marrsrch.html."Illinois State Archives -- Online Databasehttp://www.ilsos.gov/GenealogyMWeb/marrsrch.htmlIllinois Statewide Marriage Index, 1763–1900Morgan County, Illinois====THOMAS, ELI to HEDENLERY, MARY; 1853-04-06; B/ 90 2808 MORGAN."
8. Obituary."Obituary: Mrs. S. M. Hays died the 31st day of March, 1898. She was sick 11 days. She was born September 1, 1828, in Kentucky. Her father, Peter Hedenberg moved to Jacksonville, Ill, when she was quite small, where she was raised. In April 5, 1853 she was married to Eli S. Thompson (Thomas) and lived with him till October 19, 1862, when he died. She married William. C. Hays May 3, 1863. He died in 1880. She had been a consistent member of the Christian Church since she was 22years old. Barton Stone baptized her. She was a loving mother and good and kind to every one. She took great delight in reading this paper, She lived with her only daughter. She leaves two sons and one daughter and a host of neighbors and friends to mourn her loss. What was our loss was gain.Mrs A. SloanMangum, Oklahoma."
9. Cemetery Records. Newport Cemetery, Jack, TexasThe cemetery is located N of Newport, Texas, about 0.5 miles N on CR 1288, E of road.http://www.cemeteries-of-tx.com/Wtx/Jack/cemetery/Newport.html == Hays, Susan Mary, Sep 19, 1828, Mar 31, 1898, 3, 23

Hays, Wm. Carrel, Aug 17, 1817, 1892, 3, 23,
Thomas, Owen C., Aug 15, 1854, Apr 11, 1936, 3, 23
Thomas, Nancy J., Aug 21, 1860, May 22, 1936, 3, 23
Sloan, Mary Alice, May 22, 1858, Oct 22, 1926, 3, 23.
10. Family Information. "Owen Cadmus THOMAS Birth: 15 AUG 1854 in IOWA Death: 11 APR 1936_Father: Eli Sigler THOMAS b: 1823 _Mother: Susan Mary HEDENBERG b: 19 SEP 1828 in Kentucky_Marriage 1 Nancy Jane HUGHEY b: 21 AUG 1860 Children Teb THOMAS b: 1897 Henry THOMAS Victor Malone THOMAS b: 28 JAN 1893 Artie THOMAS b: 7 AUG 1899 Muriel THOMAS b: 1903."
11. Death Index."Name: Owen Cadmus Thomas; Death Date: 11 Apr 1936; Death County: Wichita; Certificate: 23618; Source Information:Ancestry.com. Texas Death Index, 1903-2000 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006. Original data: Texas Department of Health. Texas Death Indexes, 1903-2000. Austin, TX, USA: Texas Department of Health, State Vital Statistics Unit."
12. Cemetery Records. Newport Cemetery, Jack, Texas

13. Death Certificate, Collection: Texas Deaths, 1890-1976; http://www.familysearch.org/. "Name: Nancy Jane Thomas Death date: 22 May 1936 Death place: Wichita Falls, Wichita, Texas Gender: FemaleRace or color (on document): White Age at death: 75 years 9 months 1 day Birth date: 21 Aug 1860Birth place: Fayetteville, Ala.Marital status: WidowedSpouse name: Owen Cadmus Thomas Father name: James ... HugheyFather birth place: S. Carlina Mother name: Hulda Bruton Mother birth place: Mississippi Occupation: Housewife Residence: Wichita Falls, Texas Burial place: Newport, Texas Burial date: 24 May 1936Additional relatives: XFilm number: 2116935Digital GS number: 4166731Image number: 3628Reference number: cn 28494Collection: Texas Deaths, 1890-1976; www.familysearch.org."
14. Cemetery Records. Newport Cemetery, Jack, Texas

15. Cemetery Records. Newport Cemetery, Jack, Texas
16. Cemetery Records. Newport Cemetery, Jack, Texas

Doctor Eli Sigler Thomas

There were several physicians executed in the Gainesville Hangings -- Eli Sigler Thomas was one of them.

Doctor Eli Sigler Thomas was born in Ohio. His parents are unknown at this time. He married Susan Mary Hedenburg 5 Apr 1853 in Morgan County, Illinois. Susan was the daughter of Peter Cadmus Hedenberg and Susan Spencer of Jacksonville, Morgan, Illinois.

By 1854, Eli and Susan were living in Iowa when their son, Owen Cadmus Thomas, was born on 15 Aug 1854. Eli is listed on the 1856 Lee County, Iowa State Census as a farmer. His wife, son, Cadmus, and a 39 year old, John Thomas are listed with him.
Is the John Thomas living in the household a brother to Eli Thomas? Who are Eli's parents?


1856 Lee County, Iowa State Census

It is not known exactly if, when, or where Eli Thomas received his medical training to become a physician. He was listed as a farmer in the 1856 Iowa State Census and as a "M.D." in the 1860 Cooke County, Texas Census.

Sometime between 1856 and May of 1858, Eli and family moved to Texas. Daughter, Mary Alice (Allie), was born 22 May 1858 in Texas. Eli is listed in the 1860 Cooke County, Texas Census as a 37 year old "M.D." born in Ohio. The value of his real estate is $2,000 and $8,460 of personal estate. One of his near neighbors listed in the census, was A. D. Scott (Alexander D. Scott), who was also a victim of the hanging.

1860 Cooke County, Texas Census


Eli S. Thomas was one of 19 men condemned by the jury of the 'Great Hanging at Gainesville' on October 18 and hanged on Sunday, October 19, 1862. It is not known where his body is buried.

Richard McCaslin writes in his book, 'Tainted Breeze', this about Eli S. Thomas: "Thomas, the physician who had been initiated by Crisp at his shop in August, also wrote to the jurors on October 18, asking them to reconsider his case. He named four witnesses, including Crisp, who could clear him if they were allowed to speak, but the jury refused to consider new testimony. Thomas even promised to help implicate others if released, but in vain. He wrote a will on October 19, in which he reflected sadly on the "uncertainty of this frail and transitory life" and left all his possessions to his wife, Susan, and their children, before climbing on the wagon to ride to his hanging."
Eli S. Thomas Will
Cooke County, Texas Wills, Vol 1, pg 324-325

The State of Texas
County of Cooke
In the name of God Amen. I, Eli S. Thomas of the County of Cooke State aforesaid being of sound mind and memory and considering the uncertainty of this frail and transitory life do therefore make and ordain publish and declare this to be my last will and testament, that is to say first after all my lawful debts are paid and discharged, the residue of my estate real and personal, I give bequeath and dispose of all as follows to wit, To my beloved wife Susan Mary Thomas during her natural life, and to my son Owen Cadmus and my daughter Mary Alice for their use and benefit.
Likewise, I make constitute and appoint my wife Susan Mary Thomas Guardian and Administratrix of this my last Will and Testament, hereby revoking all former wills by me made.
I further wish that my estate may not be probated.
In witness whereof I hereunto subscribe my name and affix my seal using scroll this 19th day of October AD 1862.
Eli S. Thomas
Sworn and subscribed before me the undersighned authority this 19th day of October AD 1862 in the Town of Gainesville.
Sam'l Gooding, Clerk

Monday, November 24, 2008

Under the Rebel Flag

The Texas State Library and Archives Commission has a great website about life in Texas during the Civil War. The website is called UNDER THE REBEL FLAG.

Under the Rebel Flag -- Life in Texas During the Civil War
http://dev.texshare.edu/exhibits/civilwar/index.html
http://dev.texshare.edu/exhibits/civilwar/dissent.html

Friday, November 21, 2008

William R. Rhodes Pardon?

A descendant of the William Rhodes family sent this comment:

"William R. Rhodes was husband of Amanda Lindsey, youngest dau of Charles and Polly Lindsey... The story in our family is that Amanda Lindsey wrote letters to officials of Texas, and finally gained a pardon and acquittal for William R. Rhodes (sometimes spelled Rhoades and even Rodes)."

We would very interested to know if Amanda Lindsey Rhodes was granted a pardon and acquittal for her husband, William R. Rhodes. Anyone live in the Austin area that can do some research in the State Archives and report back?

Tuesday, November 18, 2008

Eli Scott Descendants


A descendant of Eli M. Scott has sent the following information:

Thank you so much for the information on Eli Scott.
Here is what I know about my family:
1860 Census
Eli Scott (49) B. in TN 1811
Maria Scott (white ) (24) B.KY 1835
married @1850
Children
1.Amanda M.K.Scott B.1852 AR
2.Caledonia C. V. Scott B 1856,AR
3.Celeta A.M. Scott B. 1858 AR
4. John W. Scott (16) B.1844 AR
5. Zac T. Scott (12) B. 1848 AR
1870 Census:
Maria Scott (36) (Black) B. KY (At that time Indians were listed as Black and since all the children were listed as white, we think Maria was an Indian)
(**note: Census taker could have made a mistake when putting a "B" by her name on the census form.)
Children
1. Amanda (17) (White) B.AR
2.Caledonia (24) (White) B. AR
3.Seleda (12) (White) B.AR
*4. William (9) (White) B.TX
5.Jacob (5) (White) B TX
William mar. Nancy Elizabeth Cox(B. TN 1895)
Children
*1. Harry Scott B. 1895 KS
2.Myrtle May Scott B1898, KS
3.Jennie Edith Scott B.1900 KS
Harry Scott married Lenora Mae Morris
Children
1. Alvin Willard Scott B.30 Dec.1917 Died 9 Nov 2005
2.George Leon Scott B.4 July 1919 Died @Sep 2007
3. Chester Duane "Wayne" Scott B.25 jan 1921 Died 13 Jun1993
* 4.William Dale Scott B.22 Jun 1923 Married Lois May Mathis (Died 6 Feb 2003)
Married Delores Lerner (Died @Mar 2006)

Eli M. Scott Family

Eli M. Scott Family
1. Eli M. Scott 1,2,3,4,5,6 was born about 1811 in Tennessee. He was hanged on 13 Oct 1862 in Gainesville, Cooke, Texas as a victim of "The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas, 1862." According to James Lemuel Clark, Scott was buried7 in Cooke County, Texas on the "Rhodes survey, now (1916-1926) owned by Sam McClerran".
Clark states that Eli Scott was from California, but McCaslin states the following: “Clark, recalled that Scott came to Texas from California, but on June 1, 1858, Scott sold his possessions located in Scott County, Arkansas -- 5 horses, 50 or 60 cattle, 2 wagons, 8 to 10 sheep and some furniture -- to F.M. Scott, a woman, for $800. (Cooke Cty. Deed Record, V, 577) He purchased 220 acres soon thereafter, because he paid taxes in Cooke County on this land in 1861 and 1862, when he also paid taxes on 8 horses and 9 cattle.” (Note: It is possible that Eli Scott was in California for a short period of time, but we have found no record of him there.)

Eli married (1) Sarah Erwin on 23 Nov 1835 in , Shelby , Tennessee. Sarah died about 1850.
Eli had the following known children from the first marriage:
1. John W. Scott was born in 1844 in , , Arkansas.
2. Zac T. Scott was born in 1848 in , , Arkansas.
(note: There are probably more children from this marriage. There marriage was in 1835 and first known child born in 1855.)
Where was the Eli Scott family in the 1850 census?

Eli married (2) Maria 8,9 about 1850. Maria was born about 1835 in Kentucky. They had three daughters by 1860. The family can be found in the 1860 Cooke County, Texas census (below).
Who is the 23 year old 'Doctor Scott' next to Eli Scott in the census?

1860 Census
After her husband was killed in the Great Hanging at Gainesville, Maria Scott moves her family to Waco, McLennan County, Texas by the 1870 Census (shown below). In addition to their three daughters, Maria had two sons in the household by the 1870 census: William who is 9 years old and Jacob who is 5. How did Maria have a child 5 years old in the 1870 census, when her husband died in October 1862. Maria may have been just barely expecting when her husband was killed in the hanging in October 1862. The child would have been born in June of 1863 -- making the child at least 6 or 7 in the 1870 census. Or she could have had a child from another father. One wonders how vulnerable these poor widows were after losing their husbands.
What happened to Maria and her children after 1870? Where are they in the 1880 census?

1870 Census

Eli and Maria had the following children:
1. Amanda M. R. Scott was born about 1852 in Arkansas.
2. Caledonia C. V. Scott was born about 1856 in Arkansas.
3. Celeta A. M. G. Scott was born about 1858 in Arkansas.
4. William M. Scott 10 was born in Dec 1861 in Texas.
William married Nancy Elizabeth Cox about 1895. Nancy was born in Jul 1859 TN. William can be found in the 1900 Cowley County, Kansas census.
5. Jacob Scott was born about 1864 in Texas.

Where are the children after 1870? We only have information on one of the children -- William. Did the other children marry? If so, who are their spouses and where did they live?

Sources
1. Clark, James Lemuel; Edited by L.D. Clark, Civil War Recollections of James Lemuel Clark , Texas A&M University Press, College Stateion, Texas 77843, ISBN 0-89096-205-7
"After some concideration I will rite a brief statement an give the fact in regard to the 44 good men that was murderd by a mob in Gainesville, Cooke County, Texas in October 1862, as I no more a bout the men then eney body else now in this country. Will say tha were murderd for there Union princeables... One of our near neighbors was William Rhodes. He (came) from North Carolina here, an got 320 acres of land as a homestead from the state. He had a nice familey an his oaldest boy belong to the same company that I belonged to. Now Rhodes sold land to a man by the name of Eli Scott a bout the time the war started. An Scott moved to the land an was murderd while he lived on the land. He Scott (came) from California here, an had a big famley, and was nice foalks. Him an Rhodes were hung the same day. Tha are boath buried on the Rhodes survey, now owned by Sam McClerran."
2. "One of forty-two Union sympathizing citizens of North Texas who were charged with treason against the Confederacy by a Citizens Court in Gainesville, Cooke County in October 1862 and then executed in the Great Hanging at Gainesville. References: 1. Richard B. McCaslin, "Tainted Breeze, The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas, 1862" (Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Louisiana State University Press, 1994). 2. George W. Diamond, "Account of the Great Hanging at Gainesville, 1862" SOUTHWESTERN HISTORICAL QUARTERLY, Vol. 66, no. 3, January, 1963, p. 331-414, edited by Sam Acheson and Julie Ann Hudson O'Connell. 3. James L. Clark, "Civil War Recollections of James Lemuel Clark, Including Previously Unpublished Material On The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas In October, 1862" (College Station, Texas: Texas A&M University Press, 1984).".
3. George Washington Diamond's Account of the Great Hanging at Gainesville, 1862, ManuscripteEdited by Sam Acheson and Julie, The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Vol. LXVI, January, 1963, No. 3, pages 331-414, pg .397.George W. Diamond was a brother of secessionists, John R. Diamond and James J. Diamond, who was a principal in the Great Hanging. After the hangings and the adjournment of the court, Diamond was given the records for the purpose of "preserving them and so disposing of them that the history of its (Citizen's Court) transactions might be perpetuated and justice done to those who participated in its deliberations. Diamond's compilation of "memoranda" was to be offered to the public as a just vindicaton of the conduct of those whose judgements were under national criticism. The members of the court examined Diamond's account and gave their unanimous and unqualified approval."pg 397 The State vs. C. A. Jones("HumpBack"), James Powers ("Carpenter"), Eli M. Scott, Thomas Baker ("Old Man"), Geo W Anderson, Abraham McNeese, Henry Cochran ("30"), C.F. Anderson, Wm Wernell, B.F. Barnes ("35 or 40"), Wm Rodes, and N. M. Clark ("25"). Disloyalty & Treason.The testimony against the above mentioned conspirators corresponds with the testimony herein before produced on the trial of Childs, Fields, Harper, Lock, and others. They all acknowledged their connection with the organization, and made full confession of their guilt at the gallows
4. 1860 U.S. Census, Texas, Cooke, Gainesville P.O., pg6, hh 97/99. "Name: Eli Scott Age in 1860: 49 Birth Year: abt 1811 Birthplace: Tennessee Home in 1860: Cooke, Texas Post Office: Gainesville Value of real estate: $440; Value of personal estate: $447
Household Members: Eli Scott, 49, m, farmer, 440/447, Tennessee; Maria Scott, 24, f, Kentucky; Amanda M R Scott, 7, Arkansas; Calidona C V Scott, 4, Arkansas; Celeta A M G Scott, 1, Arkansas; John W Scott, 16, Arkansas; Zac t Scott, 12, Arkansas. Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: , Cooke, Texas; Roll: M653_1291; Page: 227."
5. Tax Records."Cooke County, Texas1857: Poll Tax 1861: Tax on land (220 acres)1862: Tax on land, 8 horses, 9 cattle."
6. McCaslin, Richard B., Tainted Breeze, The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas, 1862 , Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Louisiana State University Press, 1993. xvi, 234 pp. Intro. App. Illus. Map. Index., page 203. "Scott...paid his first poll tax in Cooke County in 1857. His neighbor, James L. Clark, recalled that Scott came to Texas from California, but on June 1, 1858, Scott sold his possessions located in Scott County, Arkansas -- 5 horses, 50 or 60 cattle, 2 wagons, 8 to 10 sheep and some furniture -- to F.M. Scott, a woman, for $800. (Cooke Cty. Deed Record, V, 577) He purchased 220 acres soon thereafter, because he paid taxes in Cooke County on this land in 1861 and 1862, when he also paid taxes on 8 horses and 9 cattle."
7. Clark, James Lemuel; Edited by L.D. Clark, Civil War Recollections of James Lemuel Clark ."Page 109 Tha (William R. Rhodes & Eli Scott) are boath buried on the Rhodes survey, now owned by Sam McClerran."
8. 1860 U.S. Census, Texas, Cooke, Gainesville P.O., pg 6, hh 97/99. "Name: Eli Scott Age in 1860: 49 Birth Year: abt 1811 Birthplace: Tennessee Home in 1860: Cooke, Texas Post Office: Gainesville Value of real estate: $440; Value of personal estate: $447Household Members: Name Age Eli Scott, 49, m, farmer, 440/447, Tennessee Maria Scott, 24, f, KentuckyAmanda M R Scott, 7, ArkansasCalidona C V Scott, 4, ArkansasCeleta A M G Scott, 1, ArkansasJohn W Scott, 16, ArkansasZac t Scott, 12, ArkansasSource Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: , Cooke, Texas; Roll: M653_1291; Page: 227; Image: 464."
9. 1870 U.S. Census, Texas, West of Brazos, McLennan, Waco "Name: Maria Scott Estimated Birth Year: abt 1834 Age in 1870: 36 Birthplace: Arkansas Home in 1870: West of The Brazos River, McLennan, Texas Post Office: Waco Maria Scott, 36, f, b, keeping house, KentuckyAmanda Scott, 17, f, w, ArkansasCaledonia Scott, 14, f, w, ArkansasSeleda Scott, 12, f, w, ArkansasWilliam Scott, 9, m, w, TexasJacob Scott, 5, m, w, TexasSource Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: West of The Brazos River, McLennan, Texas; Roll: M593_1598; Page: 136; Image: 268."
10. 1900 U.S. Census, Kansas, Cowley, Winfield.

Sunday, November 16, 2008

Honoring Those Who Died

On Sunday, October 19, 1862, the final nineteen victims of the Gainesville Hanging were hanged.
So last month, on Sunday, October 19th, several of us who are descendants visited the Georgia Davis Bass Park, the location of the Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas 1862. Sunday, October 19th was chosen because that is when our ancestor and 18 other men were hanged. We don't know the exact location on Pecan Creek where their bodies were buried, so we left flowers and flags at the historical marker in the park.

The burial place for most of these men was along the banks of Pecan Creek. No headstones were ever placed on any of the graves of the men who were buried there along the creek. There could be over thirty (30+) men who are buried there. Even though there are no headstones to mark the exact grave sites, that area along Pecan creek is considered a cemetery or sacred ground by all of us who are descendants of one of the victims of the Gainesville Hanging.
There are only five known grave sites for the victims of the Gainesville Hanging. An earlier post (http://gainesvilletx1862.blogspot.com/2008/08/where-are-they-buried.html) listed the known and suggested burial places.

This last picture is on the opposite side of the historical marker and is looking toward the bridge.

Sunday, November 9, 2008

Not Just A Name On A List

In October 1862, 40 men died, breathing their last breath with a rope around their neck. Several others died from gunshot wounds.
Every man who died during the Gainesville Hangings is important and not just because their name is on a list.  Behind every name written on the list was a real person.  These were men with hopes and dreams -- men with families and loved ones. Most came to Texas hoping for a better future for themselves and their families. Instead, they met a premature death at the end of a rope and their family was left alone on the Texas frontier.
They had wives, children, parents, brothers, sisters, cousins, aunts, uncles and friends who grieved when they died. Many of the men were connected to each other by blood or marriage. Several large extended family groups lost several loved ones during the hanging. Their sorrow was inconsolable. We have made lists of the men who died during the hanging and of their wives -- these lists were made to help facilitate our research. Please remember that each and every man and woman on these lists was a unique human being and not just a name on a list.

Thursday, October 16, 2008

Dicey Chiles

Dicey (Dicy) Chiles was the widow of Dr. Henry Chiles, the first person to be hanged in the Great Hanging at Gainesville. (see previous post on Dr. Henry Chiles) Dicey had just recently given birth to a sweet baby girl when her husband was killed. She named her new daughter, Mary Henryetta, after her husband. Dicey also had six other children: Elizabeth, George, Sarah, Margaret, John and James. Sometime before 1870 she moved her young family to Mercer County, Illinois. Her oldest daughter, Elizabeth, was hired out as a domestic servant. Dicey later moved with her married children to Taylor County, Iowa. She is buried in Taylor County, Iowa next to her daughter.

An obituary for Dicy Chiles, with references to her husband and the Gainesville hanging, can be found in another post on this blog.


In 1891, Dicey, her children, sister-in-law and others brought suit against other Chiles family members over the execution of the will of Henry Chiles, Sr.

***IS Henry Chiles, Sr. who wrote the will, the father or uncle of Dr. Henry Chiles, Gainesville hanging victim and husband of Dicey??  (note: Henry was a popular name in the Chiles family. Every generation had several men named Henry.)

The following newspaper notice (below) was placed in the Knoxville Journal in March of 1891.
THE KNOXVILLE JOURNAL March 25, 1891
HEIRS-AT-LAW OF THE SPECIFIC LEGATEES UNDER THE WILL OF HENRY CHILIES, DEC'D.No. 4,263
Whereas a bill has been filed in chancery court at Knoxville, Tenn., by Dicey A. Chiles, widow of Henry Chiles, Jr., dec'd; George W. Chiles, James F. Chiles, Elizabeth J. Powell and Robert M. Powell, her husband, Mary H. Powell and James E. Powell, her husband, Sarah A. Langley and James F. Langley, Mary Shafer (widow), Margaret Chiles (widow), James Chiles, son of Margaret; Martha Fleener and her husband Adam Fleener, and William Chiles,
AGAINST Henry Chiles, a resident of the state of Missouri, Francis M. Chiles, of Warren county, Iowa; William Chiles, jr., of Washington county, Virginia, H.H. Hamilton, of Mendota, Virginia, and the unknown heirs or specific legatees of Henry Chiles, sr., dec’d, and their heirs, all of whom their names and residences are unknown and cannot be ascertained after diligent inquiry except as they are described in the original bill formerly pending in this honorable court of the name and style of C. W. Karns, et at exrs vs. Mary I. Chiles, afterwards Sam’l Shields, admi’r, et al., wherein their names and residences are set forth as follows:
First: Children of Fanny Barker, sister of testator, as follows: Henry Barker, Charles Barker, Sarah who married James Sprowls, and another daughter whose christian name was stated to be unknown, but who married Pesquel White, all of whom resided in Lee county, Virginia; George Barker, Wm. Barker, Elizabeth Barker who resided in Washington county, Virginia; Phoebe, wife of Isaac Miller, whose residences were unknown; Polly, wife of George Clark, residents of Missouri, and Joel Parker who resided in Sullivan county, Tenn.
Second: Children of Katherine Barker, excepting William Code and wife, as follows: Thomas Barker and Joseph Barker of Washington county, Virginia; Charles Barker, of Lee county, Virginia; Henry Barker, Sam’l Barker, Paul Barker, and Polly Dowell, wife of Thomas Dowell, all of Know county, Tennessee.
Third: Children of Nancy Meek, to-wit: Sam’l Meek and four daughters whose christian names were unknown, the first of whom married John Chiles; the second, Henry Sullivan; the third, Elisha Bowers, and fourth, Anderson Thomas, and were residents of Indiana.
Fourth: Children of Polly Russell, to-wit – John Russell and Abraham Russell both of whom resided in Missouri, and the names of other children, if any, were unknown.
Fifth: Children of William Chiles, to-wit – William Chiles, Sally who married Wm. Sprawls, Martha wife of Adam Fleener, John Chiles, Almon Chiles, residents of Virginia; Nancy, wife of George Maloney, Anna wife of Logan Willis; James Chiles, Henry Chiles, William Chiles, Francis Chiles and Ephraim Chiles, who were alleged to be residents of the state of Missouri; and
Sixth: Children of Nolen Chiles, or Rolen Chiles, to-wit – James William, Henry G., John A. and George Chiles and two daughters, one of whom married Abram Smith and the other Sam’l Meek, but whose christen names were unknown, but the residents of the state of Indiana.
These and the unknown heirs of all of said specific legatees whether they are all mentioned or not, and their descendants whose names and residences are known after diligent inquiry are made defendants and said bill seeks to sell for partition a tract of land in Knox county, Tennessee, which was purchased at an execution sale on the 8th of February, 1873, by the specific legatees under the will of Henry Chiles, who died in Knox county, Tennessee, many years ago.
Now therefore, it is hereby ordered that all the parties named above as defendants and all the heirs-at-law of the specific legatees under the will of Henry Chiles, to-wit –
“The children of his sister, Fanny,”
“The children of his sister, Katherine Barker, excepting William Code and wife,”
“The children of his sister, Nancy Meek,”
“The children of his sister Polly Russell,”
“The children of his brother Rolen or Nolen Chiles,”
– whose names are not given above and whose names and residences are unknown and cannot be ascertained upon diligent enquiry, come forward and make themselves parties to this suit and make defense to said bill on or before the first Monday of May next or the same will be taken for confessed and set for hearing exparte.
This notice will be published in the Knoxville Journal for four consecutive weeks.
This 9th day of March, 1891.W. L. Trent, C.& M.By W. A. Galbraith, D.C. & M.J.W. Sneed and Cornick & Caldwell, Sols.

Wednesday, October 15, 2008

Bennet C. Barnes

Bennet C. Barnes Family

Bennet C. Barnes was born about 1824 in Alabama or Tennessee. (It appears that he was called Ben verbally and then assumptions made it be Benjamin. The initials B. C. was also used and all legal documents give his name as Bennet C. Barnes.)
He died on 13 Oct 1862 in Gainesville, Cooke, Texas. Bennet Barnes was one of the victims of "The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas, 1862".

Bennet married Sarah A. Rodgers about 1848.
Sarah was born in May 1831 in Alabama. She died after 1900 in Texas. She was sometimes called Sary. Sarah was blind before 1870. (Blind in both 1870 & 1880 census.) Her youngest child was born around 1862. Sarah was left a widow on the Texas Frontier with an infant, four other children and was blind by 1870. 

Bennet and Sarah had the following children:
i. Simeon Barnes was born in Sep 1848 in Texas.
Simeon married Nancy C Smith on 25 Feb 1868 in Hopkins, Texas. Nancy was born in Feb 1848 in Texas.
ii. John Barnes was born about 1853 in Texas.
John married Laura Boyd on 13 Jul 1884.
iii. Susan Olive Barnes was born in 4 Feb 1857 in Wise County, Texas and died 8 April 1923 in Stephens County, Texas and buried in the Shady Grove Cemetery in Stephens County. Called “Ollie”. Susan married John Green Littlepage . John was born on 16 Jun 1854 in Texas. He died on 22 Jun 1936.
iv. Joel Densmore Barnes was born in May 1859 in Texas. He died in 1929 in Wise County, Texas. He was buried in Chico Cemetery, Wise, Texas.
Joel married Rachel Ann Perkins . Rachel was born on 9 Dec 1859 in Texas. She died on 17 Dec 1919 in Wise County, Texas. She was buried in Chico Cemetery, Wise, Texas.
v. Mary Jane Barnes was born 12 Oct 1861 in Texas and died 1 Jul 1935 in Era, Cooke, Texas. She married J. B. Stevens in 1885 and then married ?Blair.

Sources
1.George Washington Diamond's Account of the Great Hanging at Gainesville, 1862, ManuscripteEdited by Sam Acheson and Julie, The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Vol. LXVI, January, 1963, No. 3, pages 331-414, pg .397.George W. Diamond was a brother of secessionists, John R. Diamond and James J. Diamond, who was a principal in the Great Hanging. After the hangings and the adjournment of the court, Diamond was given the records for the purpose of "preserving them and so disposing of them that the history of its (Citizen's Court) transactions might be perpetuated and justice done to those who participated in its deliberations. Diamond's compilation of "memoranda" was to be offered to the public as a just vindicaton of the conduct of those whose judgements were under national criticism. The members of the court examined Diamond's account and gave their unanimous and unqualified approval. " pg 397 The State vs. C. A. Jones("HumpBack"), James Powers ("Carpenter"), Eli M. Scott, Thomas Baker ("Old Man"), Geo W Anderson, Abraham McNeese, Henry Cochran ("30"), C.F. Anderson, Wm Wernell, B.F. Barnes ("35 or 40"), Wm Rodes, and N. M. Clark ("25"). Disloyalty & Treason. The testimony against the above mentioned conspirators corresponds with the testimony herein before produced on the trial of Childs, Fields, Harper, Lock, and others. They all acknowledged their connection with the organization, and made full confession of their guilt at the gallows.
pg 398
Witness in trial against Ramey Day; Ben F. Barnes sworn.(Witness)I was at the meeting at Richie's Mill. Dr. Foster said the object of the meeting was to resue Harper; and he wanted us to take our guns and go -- myself and Ramey Dye. The reason we did not go to rescue Harper was because a messenger (Essman) told us that there were a great many soldiers in Gainesville and we were then afraid."
2. 1850 U.S. Census, Texas, Hopkins, hh 227.
"1850 Census of Hopkins Co. Texas _227
Bennet BARNS 26 M Farmer $80 Alabama
Sary BARNS 19 F Alabama
Simon BARNS 1 M Texas."
3. 1860 U.S. Census, Texas, Wise County, pg 25/317, hh 116/168, 2 Jun 1860.
"Barnes, Bennet C., 36, m, Farmer, 320/700, Alabama
" , Sarah A., 30, f, Alabama
" , Simeon, 10, m, Texas
" , John, 6, m, Texas
" , Olive, 3, f, Texas
" , Joel, 1, m, Texas
" , Tennessee, 10, f, Texas (This is probably a niece, daughter of William & Rebecca Waits Barnes, who were killed by Indians in 1854.)
Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: , Wise, Texas; Roll: M653_1308; Page: 317;."
4. Land/Deed Records.
"WISE & DENTON Counties Texas_Texas General land Office in Austin.
SIMON P BARNES S. BARNES 73 _BC BARNES B. BARNES 124
Grantee: Bennet C. Barnes
Patentee: Bennet C. Barnes
Patent Date: 01 Jun 1859 _Acres: 160 _District: Fannin _County: Denton _File: 2727 Patent #: 330 Patent Volume: 24 Class: Fan. 3rd.
_District surveyors from Cooke County in the north and Denton County to the east mapped out the area, most of which was drawn from Cooke County. Wise County was officially established by legislative act on January 23, 1856, and was named in honor of Henry A. Wise, a United States Congressman from Virginia, who, during the 1840s, supported the annexation of Texas
Grantee: Bennet C. Barnes_
Patentee: Bennet C. Barnes_Patent Date: 01 Jun 1859_Acres: 160_District: Fannin This is in Denton County. _File: 2727_Patent #: 330_Patent Volume: 24_Class: Fan. 3rd.
Grantee: B. C. Barnes_Patentee: Hrs. of B. C. Barnes_Patent Date: 09 Apr 1873_Acres: 160
This correlates to:_District: Fannin B.C. Barnes Survey, A-124, Wise County, Texas_County: Wise This document is filed in Volume 6, Page 590,
File: 1597_Patent #: 78_Patent Volume: 20_Class: Fan. Scrip.
Grantee: B. C. Barnes_Patentee: Hrs. of B. C. Barnes Dec'd_Patent Date: 21 Jan 1960_Acres: 160 This is a Correction Patent pertaining to the above_District: Fannin
This document is filed in Volume 230, Page 372
County: Wise_File: 1597_Patent #: 474_Patent Volume: 29-B_Class: FAN. SCR.
General Warranty Deed dated November 3, 1874 from Sarah Barnes to G W Perkins recorded in Volume 6, Page 591
It appears to cover the entire 160 acre survey.
General Warranty Deed dated July 24, 1884 from S R Barnes to G W Perkins recorded in Volume 12, Page 114"
5. 1870 U.S. Census, Texas, Hopkins County.
"Name: Sarah A Barnes
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1829; Age in 1870: 41; Birthplace: Alabama
Home in 1870: Precinct 5, Hopkins, Texas; Post Office: Charleston
Race: White; Gender: Female Whether deaf & dumb, blind, insane/idiotic: BLIND
Value of real estate: none
Household Members: Name, Age
Sarah A Barnes, 41
John Barnes, 15
Ollie Barnes, 13
Jane Barnes, 8
Source Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: Precinct 5, Hopkins, Texas; Roll: M593_1592; Page: 166;."
6. 1880 U.S. Census, Texas, Wise County.
"Name: Sarah A. Barnes;
Home in 1880: Precinct 2, Wise, Texas;
Age: 48 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1832 Birthplace: Alabama
Relation to Head of Household: Self (Head)
Father's birthplace: Alabama Mother's birthplace: Indiana;
Occupation: Keeping House; Marital Status: Widowed Race: White;
Gender: Female; Health: BLIND
Household Members: Name Age
Sarah A. Barnes 48
John B. Barnes 23
Joel D. Barnes 21
Mary J. Barnes 17
T. B. Emerson 22
Source Citation: Year: 1880; Census Place: Precinct 2, Wise, Texas; Roll: T9_1333; Family History Film: 1255333; Page: 121.1000; Enumeration District: 126; .
Source Information: Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005."
7. 1900 U.S. Census, Texas, Wise County.
"Name: Sarah A Barnes
Home in 1900: Justice Precinct 7, Wise, Texas Age: 65 Birthplace: Alabama
Relationship to head-of-house: Mother Race: White
Household Members: Name Age
Joel D Barnes 41 Racheal A Barnes 40 James D Barnes 12
John W Barnes 16 Jessie G Barnes 15 Ollie M Barnes 12
Sarah A Barnes 65
Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Justice Precinct 7, Wise, Texas; Roll: T623 1681; Page: 11A; Enumeration District: 150."
8. Family Information.
"Simeon R. Barnes (b.Sep 1848-Texas; d.Aft 1900-Last seen Johnston County,Oklahoma)
spouse: Nancy C Smith (b.Feb 1848-Texas; m.25 Feb 1868, Hopkins County, TX; d.Aft 1900-Last seen Johnston County,Oklahoma)
Children: 1. Sara Jane "Jennie" Barnes (b.5 Aug 1869;d.7 Jan 1907-Charlie,Clay County,Texas) sp: George Henry Jones (b.12 Jan 1866-Delta County Texas;m.3 Mar 1887;d.27 Sep 1940-Charlie,Clay County,Texas) 2. Louis B Barnes (b.Feb 1871-Texas;d.Aft 1900-Last seen Johnston County,Oklahoma) 3. William J Barnes (b.1874-Texas) 4. John R Barnes (b.1876-Texas) 5. Samantha Barnes (b.1878-Texas) 6. Mary Barnes (b.Oct 1882-Texas)1900 Chickasaw territory with wife Nancy, son Louis and daughter Mary. His mother, Sarah A Barnes and children were in Hopkins co in 1870. Simeon and Nancy were in Wise Co in 1880 as was his mother, Sarah and family....."
9. 1900 U.S. Census, Texas, Wise County.
"Name: Sarah A Barnes Home in 1900: Justice Precinct 7, Wise, Texas Age: 65 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1835 Birthplace: Alabama Relationship to head-of-house: Mother Race: White Household Members: Name Age Joel D Barnes 41 Racheal A Barnes 40 James D Barnes 12 John W Barnes 16 Jessie G Barnes 15 Ollie M Barnes 12 Sarah A Barnes 65 Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Justice Precinct 7, Wise, Texas; Roll: T623 1681; Page: 11A; Enumeration District: 150."
10. 1910 U.S. Census.
11. 1920 U.S. Census.
"Name: Joel D Barnes_Home in 1920: Chico, Wise, Texas Age: 60 years Estimated Birth Year: abt 1860 Birthplace: Texas Relation to Head of House: Head Father's Birth Place: Alabama Mother's Birth Place: Alabama Marital Status: Married Race: White Sex: Male Home owned: Own Occupation: Cobler at a shoe shopAble to read: Yes Able to Write: Yes Household Members: Joel D. Barnes, O, F, M, W, 60 yrs, M(?), Texas, Alabama, Alabama, cobler, shoe shop Source Citation: Year: 1920;Census Place: Chico, Wise, Texas; Roll: T625_1860; Page: 7A; Enumeration District: 163."
12.
Texas Death CertificateName: Ollie Barnes Littlepage
Death date: 08 Apr 1923; Death place: 12 Mi. N.E. Moran, Stephens, Texas
Gender: Female; Race: White
Age at death: 67 years 2 months 4 days
Birth date: 04 Feb 1857; Birth place: Wise County, Tex.
Marital status: Married; Occupation: Housekeeper
Father name: Bennet Barnes; Father birth place: Tennessee
Mother name: Sarah Rodgers; Mother birth place: Alabama
Burial place: Shady Grove, Stephens Co.; Burial date: 09 Apr 1923
Film number: 2074802; Digital GS number: 4170539
Image number: 892; Reference number: cn 13372
Collection: Texas Deaths, 1890-1976;
www.familysearch.org
13. Texas Death Certificate
Name: Mary Jane Blair
Death date: 01 Jul 1935
Death place: Era, Cooke, Texas
Gender: Female; Race or color (on document): White
Age at death: 73 years 8 months 19 days
Birth date: 12 Oct 1861 Birth place: Texas
Marital status: Widowed; Occupation: No Trade
Father name: Ben Barnes
Mother name: Sarah Rodgers
Burial place: Rosston; Burial date: 02 Jul 1935
Informant: G. B. Stevens of Era, Texas
Film number: 2116623; Digital GS number: 4030353
Image number: 198; Reference number: 32172
Collection: Texas Deaths, 1890-1976; http://www.familysearch.org/


Please add any family stories or histories for this family.  How did Bennet's widow survive after his hanging?  She had five young children, the youngest just a toddler and she was going blind.

Monday, October 13, 2008

'Weeping Wives' Update

"sadness and deep sorrow reigned supreme"

Many Thanks to those who left comments on the blog, and to FamilySearch.org for putting the Texas Death Certificates 1890-1976 online. (https://familysearch.org/  hint: Death certificates can be a great place to find the maiden name of a mother.)

There are now several more spouses names and maiden names added to our WEEPING WIVES list.
Below is a repeat of an earlier post with the additional information added.

Diamond refers to the Weeping Wives of the accused and also refers to the screaming women and children. Barret stated the following, "while those (wives) who got news that the husband was to be hung, were following or before, weeping, while wailing and lamentations burst from their lips. In some houses, sadness and deep sorrow reigned supreme. None but those who experienced that dreadful night can fully realize the deep sorrow of loving and disconsolate hearts."    See "Why This Blog" post.

Below is the list of  those who died in the Hanging and their known spouses. Please help us replace the question marks ??? with names.   There are far too many unknown spouses in the list!  Corrections are welcomed! Thanks.

Name of Victim, Name of Spouse(s)
1. C. F. > E. F. (Edward Frost) Anderson, Matilda Farris
2. George W. Anderson, ??
3. Richard J. Anderson, Lucinda ?
4. William B. Anderson, Lucinda Davis
5. Thomas O. Baker, ??
6. Bennet C. Barnes, Sarah A. Rodgers
7. Barnibus Burch, (1) May ?, (2)Mary McConnel
8. Samuel Carmichael, Anna ?
9. Ephraim Chiles, Margaret Kendrick
10. Henry Chiles, Dicy Kennedy
11. Nathaniel M. Clark, Mahuldah Hicklin
12. Henry Cockrum, Elizabeth Lackey Petell Jones
13. John Mansil Crisp, (1) Harriet Pittman, (2) Alixy Hawkins
14. Arphaxton R. Dawson, (1) Mary Horn, (2) Jane Caroline Stalcup
15. Rama Dye, (1) Sarah Jane Bradley, (2) Mary Ann Dawson
16. Hudson John Esman, (1) Rachel Meadows, (2) Mary Sullivant, (3) Elizabeth Crisp
17. Henry S. Field, (1) Jane Potter, (2) Mary Ann Bail
18. Thomas B. Floyd, Cloe Carter
19. James T. Foster, ??
20. Curd Goss, Mary Alexander
21. Edward D. Hampton, single
22. M. D. Harper, Eliza Dougherty
23. William W. Johnson, ??
24. C. A. Jones, ??
25. David Miller Leffel, Susan Evaline West
26. Leander W. P. Jacob Lock, Deannah ?, Evaline Dale
27. Abraham McNeese, Rebecca Price
28. Richard N. Martin, Cynthia Ann Neely
29. John M. Miller, Martha Jane Sandusky
30. John A. Morris, Marguerite ?
31. Wash Morris, Josephine Hornbuckle
32. M. Wesley Morris, Ann Carter
33. William W. Morris, Nancy ?
34. James A. Powers, Priscilla Barnett
35. William R. Rhodes, Amanda Lindsey
36. Alexander D. Scott, Mary Woolsey
37. Eli M. Scott, (1) Sarah Erwin, (2) Maria ?
38. Gilbert Smith, ??
39. William B. Taylor, Martha ?
40. Eli Sigler Thomas, Susan M. Hedenberg
41. James A. Ward, Nancy Muirheid
42. William Wilson Wornell, Elizabeth ?Wilkerson
==
43. William Boyles, Elizabeth T. West (Boyles not arrested but later shot & possibly died from wounds)
44. Hiram Kilborn, Delia Ann Knowles
====
William A. McCool (later hanged), Lydia Field
John M. Cottrell (later hanged), ??
A. N. Johnson (later hanged),  Armarylis Hawley

John Wiley, Eliza ?

**Updated Feb 2012

Gainesville's 'Great Hanging' Commemoration

Those of us who are descendants of the men who were hanged in the 'Great Hanging' would like to send a big thanks to Gainesville City for hosting a commemoration on Saturday, October 11, 2008, during their Depot Day Festival. For those of you who could not attend the 'Commemoration of the Great Hanging', here are some pictures of the event sent by one of the descendants.




The bell ringer would stand in front of a cross and ring the bell as each name was read.

Friday, October 10, 2008

Gainesville to Commemorate 'Great Hanging'

Tomorrow, on Saturday October 11, 2008, Gainesville will commemorate the 'Great Hanging' during their Depot Day Festival.

We are glad that Gainesville will remember the men who died in the 'Great Hanging', but it would be nice if there was enough of a notice so that the descendants of the victims of the 'Hanging' could arrange travel and attend the event. Many of the descendants live in different states all over the country.

Here are links to newspaper articles telling of the commemoration.
http://www.gainesvilleregister.com/local/local_story_282120012.html
http://www.star-telegram.com/state_news/story/967133.html

Stay tuned for a post telling about the actual commemoration service. Hopefully we will have pictures of the memorial service to post also.

Wednesday, October 1, 2008

William & Elizabeth (West) Boyles Family

William Boyles was born about 1826 in Kentucky. William Boyles and his father, Joseph Boyles, came to Texas prior to 1848 and both received land as a part of Peter's Colony that settled North Central Texas. William died about 1863 in Collinsville, Grayson, Texas. It is believed that he died from a gunshot wound and exposure as he hid from the same group responsible for the hangings. Diamond stated that Boyles was "later killed at Collinsville." We have added him to the list of the victims of the Gainesville Hanging, since his death was a result of his participation in the Peace Party and resulting arrests, trials & Hangings. (See biography on previous post.)

  • THE FAMILY LEGEND OF WILLIAM BOYLES, March 2000 By Sammy Harrison: According to family legend, William Boyles did not want to fight in the Civil War. He hid out in the hills, contracted pneumonia, and died. Mother said the way she had heard it, he was a very kind hearted person and could not stand the thoughts of taking the life of another individual. At the time, I wondered what a person like that was doing on the Texas frontier where he was forced to defend his home and family.
    ------------
  • From another descendant: My Great Great Great grandfather William boyles married an Elizabeth West May,19,1849. In the 1860 census it shows that an Ann West was living with William and Elizabeth. She was 18 at the time. I also know of a Susan Emeline. She married David Miller Leffel and moved from Ohio to Grayson Texas in the late 1850's. They may have traveled and settled there as a family because that is where William and Elizabeth (Boyles) and Ann West were also during the same time. David was hung during the great hanging in texas 1862 and William is believed to have been shot in the back when he tried to run and later died a month later from his wounds.
William married Elizabeth T. West daughter of Michael West and Susannah McKee West on 19 May 1849 in , Grayson, Texas. Elizabeth was born on 5 Dec 1831 in Champaign, Ohio. She died on 14 Mar 1898 in Erath, Texas. She was buried in Mar 1898 in Alexander Cemetery, Erath, Texas.
They had the following children:
1. Joseph McKee Boyles was born on 6 Dec 1852 in Sherman, Grayson, Texas. He died on 19 Mar 1933 in Portales, Curry, New Mexico. He was buried in Portales, Curry, New Mexico.
Joseph married (1) Mary Rose Auvenshire "Polly" on 5 Jul 1877 in Jonesboro, Coryell, Texas. Mary was born on 1 Jan 1860 in , Carroll, Tennessee. She died on 3 Apr 1879 in Aurora, Wise, Texas. She was buried in Old Bethel Cemetery, Rhome, Wise, Texas.
Joseph married (2) Sara Elizabeth Pennington in 1880 in . Sara was born on 14 Jun 1861.
2. Sarah L. Boyles was born about 1855 in , , Texas.
? IGI possible spouse: Sarah L Boyles; Female; Birth: 1855 , Texas married spouse: Thomas Grimes; Marriage: 14 APR 1872 , Coryell, TX
3. Martha S. Boyles was born on 2 Jun 1857 in , Crawford, Arkansas.
Your information on the Boyles is the same family as mine. My husbands Great Grandmother Martha Jane Boyles was born June,2 1857. She had 4 brothers, one who was Joseph McKee Boyles born 1853 according to our information. Elizabeth married a Issac Lee April 30, 1865 and Elizabeth died March 14, 1898 in Earth Co
Texas. We have been told that Martha Jane is part Cherokee Indian. I have a picture of her and Andrew Jackson Roberts her husband, and she looks Indian. But, so far I haven't been where I can check out the Indian information. My husband's niece has a Dawls Book and she showed a Martha Jane Bowles. But, her Dad's last name was Boyles. But, I need to study the book better if I ever get back to Abilene Texas where she lives. My husband's Dad always said his Grandmother was a Cherokee Indian
.
4. William Tomes Nelson Boyles was born in 8 Nov 1859 in , Cooke, Texas.
William preferred to spell his name as Boils. There was much discussion over the fact that he felt Boils was the proper spelling.
Marriage 1 Martha J. Pennington, 2 MAY 1881 in Coryell Co., TX

Sources
1. 1850 U.S. Census, Texas, Grayson, pg 674, 9 Dec 1950."Boils, William, 24, m, Kentucky, cannot read or write " , Elizabeth, 20, f, Ohio, cannot read or write, Boils, Jos, 64, 400, Virginia, cannot read or write (Next door to Father-in-law, Michael West)."
2. 1860 U.S. Census, Texas, Grayson, Sherman P.O., hh 148, pg 23/145. "Name: Wm B Boyl Age in 1860: 34 Birth Year: abt 1826 Birthplace: Kentucky Home in 1860: Grayson, Texas Post Office: Sherman Value of real estate: Household Members: Name Age Wm B Boyl, 34, m, farmer, 1600/900, Kentucky E S Boyl, 27, f, domestic, IllinoisJos Boyl, 7, m, TexasLouisa E Boyl, 5, TexasMartha S Boyl, 3, ArkansasWm F N Boyl, 5.12, TexasAnne West, 23, domestic, OhioSource Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: , Grayson, Texas; Roll: M653_1295; Page: 145; Image: 290 (**Note: Also listed in 1860 Cooke County Census)."
3. 1860 U.S. Census, Texas, Cooke County, Gainesville, pg 232-233, hh 178/184."Boyles, William, 34, m farmer, no real estate, $750 personal estate, Kentucky " , Elizabeth, 30, f, Ohio
" , Joseph, 7, m, Texas " , Sarah L., 5, f, Texas " , Martha S., 3, f, Arkansas " , Wm. T., 7/12, m, TexasWest, Ann, 18, f, Ohio (note: Not sure where Ann West fits into the family. She is most likely one of Elizabeth's nieces.) Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: , Cooke, Texas; Roll: M653_1291; Page: 232; Image: 473.(**Note: Also listed in 1860 Grayson County Census)."
4. McCaslin, Richard B., Tainted Breeze, The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas, 1862 , Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Louisiana State University Press, 1993. xvi, 234 pp. Intro. App. Illus. Map. Index
"William Boyles came to Peters Colony as a single man before July 1, 1848. He served in ranger companies during 1846 and 1848, then married in May, 1849. The 1850 Grayson County census (F.N. 14) lists him as a farmer, age twenty-four, from Kentucky, and his wife, Elizabeth, as being from Ohio.The census taker in 1860 found him in Cooke County (F.N. 184) with $730 in personal property. He had three children -- ages seven years, five years, and seven months -- born in Texas, and a three-year-old born in Arkansas. His father died in October, 1857, and William, then in Crawford County, Arkansas, inherited his land in Cooke County. He paid taxes in Cooke County in 1861 on 311 acres of the "James" Boyles grant on the Red River, but in 1862 he was assessed for only a third of this grant, 4 horses, 20 cattle, and 4 sheep."
5. Land/Deed Records."William Boyles and his father came to Texas as a part of Peter's Colony that settled North Central Texas. He received from Thomas Wm Ward, commissioner for the colony agent, a single persons share as part of Peter's Colony, of 320 acres of land in Grayson County near the town of Dorchester. Today the survey is still known as the Wm Boyles Survey. 21 Oct 1854 -- William Boyles to Thomas A. Mounts -- bond for the sale of the Joseph Boyles land lying in Collin County, TX which was sold on the steps of the Grayson Co., TX courthouse. Grayson Co., TX Deed Records Vol G pg 80.26 Mar 1855 William Boyles sold his title and interest in his Head Right Certificate to John H. Wilson for $650.00. Grayson Co., TX Deed Records, Vol G pg 167."
6. George Washington Diamond's Account of the Great Hanging at Gainesville, 1862, ManuscripteEdited by Sam Acheson and Julie, The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Vol. LXVI, January, 1963, No. 3, pages 331-414. George W. Diamond was a brother of secessionists, John R. Diamond and James J. Diamond, who was a principal in the Great Hanging. After the hangings and the adjournment of the court, Diamond was given the records for the purpose of "preserving them and so disposing of them that the history of its (Citizen's Court) transactions might be perpetuated and justice done to those who participated in its deliberations. Diamond's compilation of "memoranda" was to be offered to the public as a just vindicaton of the conduct of those whose judgements were under national criticism. The members of the court examined Diamond's account and gave their unanimous and unqualified approval."
page 83
"Boyles was later killed at Collinsville."
7. Connor, Seymour V. , Peters Colony of Texas, A History and Biographical Sketches of the Early Settlers, Texas State Historical Association; Austin; 1959. "William Boyles migrated as a single man prior to July 1, 1848. He was issued a land certificate by Thomas William Ward in 1850, which was sold unlocated and was later patented in Grayson County (Fannin Third Class No. 1569). He is listed on the census of 1850 (Grayson County, family No. 14) as a 24-year-old farmer, born in Kentucky."
8. 1870 U.S. Census, Texas, Coryell, Prec. 2, pg 275."Lee, Isaac, 60, m, farmer, 500/500, NC " , Elizabeth, 40, f, keeping house, Ohio " , William, 18, m, Louisana " , David, 15, m, Texas " , Virginia, 14, f, TexasBoyles, Jos. M., 17, m, Texas " , Sarah L., 16, f, Texas " , Martha L., 13, f, Arkansas " , William F, 11, m, Texas."
9. 1880 U.S. Census, Texas, Coryell, Texas, pg 503A.Lee, Isaac A., self, m, marr, 69, NC, farmer " , Elizabeth, wife, f, marr, 49, keeping house, OH Boil, William, stepson, m, single, 20, farmer, Texas4 others in household.
10. Marriage Record, Grayson County, Texas Marriage Book A, pg 39.
11. Marriage Record, Grayson County, TX Marriage Book A, pg 39. "Name: Elizabeth West Marriage Date: 19 May 1849 Spouse: William Boyles Marriage County: Grayson Marriage State: Texas Source: County Court Records - FHL microfilm # 1290410 item 2."FHL # 1290410 item #2.